Tacticular Cancer: We'll have your balls

  1. Welcome to rpgcodex.net, a site dedicated to discussing computer based role-playing games in a free and open fashion. We're less strict than other forums, but please refer to the rules.

    "This message is awaiting moderator approval": All new users must pass through our moderation queue before they will be able to post normally. Until your account has "passed" your posts will only be visible to yourself (and moderators) until they are approved. Give us a week to get around to approving / deleting / ignoring your mundane opinion on crap before hassling us about it. Once you have passed the moderation period (think of it as a test), you will be able to post normally, just like all the other retards.
    Dismiss Notice

Editorial RPG Codex Editorial: Darth Roxor on the State of RPG Writing

Discussion in 'RPG News & Content' started by Infinitron, Jan 25, 2017.

  1. Make America Great Again Infinitrongender: ⚧ Trade Master Patron

    Infinitron
    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2011
    Parrots:
    63,778
    Codex 2016 - The Age of Grimoire Serpent in the Staglands Dead State Divinity: Original Sin Project: Eternity Torment: Tides of Numenera Wasteland 2 Shadorwun: Hong Kong Divinity: Original Sin 2 BattleTech A Beautifully Desolate Campaign Pillars of Eternity 2: Deadfire
    Click here and disable ads!
    In the old days, continuity in episodic media was typically seen as something to be avoided. The classical sitcom was structured so that one could watch its episodes in any order and have no problem understanding what was going on. Thus, producers reasoned, they would avoid alienating more casual viewers and maximize ratings. Sometime around the 2000s, for reasons which I won't go into here, that began to change. Continuity and the resulting increased complexity in storytelling and worldbuilding became acceptable, even valuable as a source of potential licensing opportunities. It was around this time that fans increasingly began to use terms like "franchise" and "intellectual property". The accumulation of all this detail became known as "lore", which was to be dutifully analyzed and recorded by said fans on their favored franchises' official Wiki sites.

    Although videogames have never been quite as afraid of that sort of thing as the old TV shows were, they've nevertheless undergone a similar evolution. An evolution which was however attenuated by another phenomenon - the transition from text-based to fully-animated, voice-acted storytelling which happened around the same time. Game designers were forced to learn the language of cinema, which placed natural limits on their ability to indulge themselves with lore. And then Kickstarter came, and all the barriers came down. For some, it's a new golden age of RPG writing. But for many people on our forums, the kind of writing they're seeing in these neo-oldschool RPGs isn't what they wanted at all. One of the most vocal figures in this counterreaction against modern RPG writing is distinguished Codex contributor Darth Roxor, who posted a celebrated rant about it back in 2015. The following editorial is the summary of over a year of his thoughts on the matter since then. Even if you don't agree with him on some of the specifics, I think you'll find that it's one of the finer pieces that we've published. Here's an excerpt:

    The third major issue is an important one for many reasons, primarily because it helps unveil even further the incompetence and lack of creativity that sits deep inside game developers. I am referring, of course, to the shallow copying of elements from other media, which don’t really fit particularly well with video games, followed by developers hailing their products not as “games”, but as “interactive [x]” and the like. Interactive movies, books, shows and whatever other stupid fads that for some reason enjoy popularity are quite possibly the main reason why the whole video game world is stuck in place and refusing to move forward, despite the claims to the contrary that sing praises of “revolutionary new art forms”, which are supposed to be found in these pseudo-genres.

    When you consider someone saying that they are making, for instance, an “interactive movie”, what does that really mean? It’s simple – “I can’t for the life of mine come up with anything original, so I’ll just take cues from other, hardly even related stuff.” Why this has been encouraged for years now is particularly puzzling when you try to turn the tables. Imagine someone saying he wants to “write a movie in a book format” or “paint a novel”. Doesn’t this sound awful or, at least, incompatible? Case in point, I read a book recently that started with the author saying, “this is the movie I’ve always wanted to write” – naturally, it’s very bad pulp sci-fi/fantasy that has been planned as a trilogy from the get-go. Every entertainment or art medium has its own qualities and characteristics that can’t work well when transplanted into another one, and I wonder when will game developers finally realise this, because representatives of other media have realised that long ago. Take, for example, this short video about Buster Keaton.

    How old can we say cinematography, in the sense of long movies telling actual stories, was in Keaton’s time? Let’s say roughly 15 years. Already at that time did Keaton realise that your mute visual medium cannot function properly if based on text screens. So instead he focused on what the medium does stand for – action and visuals. We are now in 2017, video games have been around for over 35 years, they have turned into a huge industry and business, and we are still stuck with people who think that touting the hundred million billion word count in their new RPG is a good idea.

    Why would it be? Because more words = more content = more gud (= more payment per word for hired hack writers, but I digress)? In a development update from March, inXile say that Torment: Tides of Numenera will have a whopping 1 million words. Naturally, this can be dismissed as just fake marketing fluff, but the message still highlights a problem: why is the word count a subject of marketing? The motive behind it is obvious because it has been the same for years now: our skilled writers want it to be like a book, and a book has lots of text! Commenting upon the absurdity of the idea can be safely skipped, so let us instead draw a comparison.

    Consider Tolstoy’s War and Peace – perhaps it is slightly unfair to compare TToN and War and Peace because, ultimately, a game’s text structure is going to be much different from a book – it will need functional texts, item descriptions, different dialogue choices, etc. Indeed, much of the text content may even be exclusive of each other, if we take a very generous assumption that Torment will be non-linear enough to hide a lot of these words from the player during a single playthrough. But nevertheless, let’s do it, if just to indulge a kind of perverse flight of fancy and compare a “game-as-book” to an actual book.

    The Project Gutenberg edition of the novel spans over 1890 pages and roughly 570k words. Tolstoy was a world-class novelist and a master of the written word, which was certainly a factor in him being able to produce this intimidating colossus. Torment, apparently, has almost double the word count of War and Peace. I have my doubts whether the writers at inXile profess the same writing ability as Tolstoy, and whether they can make this huge mass of words engaging enough for me to read, even if I’m supposed to read only half of it. Even worse yet, more comparisons could be made to material of a more similar category, like all the fantasy series that span multiple entries, and which certainly achieve even higher word counts when put together. I’m sure we can all think of at least one such series, and we can also agree that most of them are of rather poor quality. So perhaps the real question here is not whether TToN can compare to War and Peace, but whether it can be captivating enough not to sink into mediocrity along with all the other one-million-word fantasy drivel. I would say the prospects are bleak.​

    Read the full article: RPG Codex Editorial: Darth Roxor on the State of RPG Writing
     
    • Brofist x 28
    • Thanks! x 6
    • Salute x 3
    • Acknowledge this user's Agenda x 2
    • Agree x 2
    • incline x 2
    • hopw roewur ne x 1
    • Interesting x 1
    • Informative x 1
    • Racist x 1
    • Bad Spelling x 1
    • WTF am I reading x 1
    ^ Top  
  2. Bestergender: ⚧ Arcane Vatnik

    Bester
    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2014
    Parrots:
    2,626
    TLRD pls?
     
    • Bad Spelling x 6
    • Funny x 4
    • decline x 3
    • Acknowledge this user's Agenda x 1
    • Edgy x 1
    • meh x 1
    ^ Top  
  3. an Administratorgender: ⚧ Arcane

    an Administrator
    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2015
    Parrots:
    4,329
    Location:
    Where expecting basics is considered perfectionism
    Sheep was right and we should have listened to him

    The amount of "hack writers" in RPG writing is increasing and we will not see so many well-written RPGs in future.

    The solution is to abandon storyfaggotry.
     
    • Brofist x 3
    • Agree x 2
    • Despair x 2
    • Informative x 2
    • Friendly x 1
    ^ Top  
  4. MRYgender: ⚧ Prestigious Gentleman Wormwood Studios Developer

    MRY
    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2012
    Parrots:
    2,939
    Location:
    California
    Literature-degree-holder with no practical experience writes 11,470 unedited words complaining about other literature-degree-holders with no practical experience writing too much in RPGs. :D

    Actually, I had the pleasure of reading an Early Access build of this article, and I think it's great and worth reading, though Darth Roxor and I disagreed on a number of points, which it seems like he has sort of addressed in the current version. (Sometimes not entirely to my satisfaction. For example "citation needed" and "weasel words" tags are probably required for "this is a background that you will see frequently among video game writers.")

    Unfortunately, I think this article is likely to have much less impact that Roxor's review of PoE, which I know was widely read among RPG developers, because it contains a mix of broad empirical claims unsupported by empirical evidence and because it raises subjective complaints that are not amenable to easy solution. "Unskilled people at the wheel" is a good example of this.

    But seriously, folks should take the time to read it.

    [EDIT:

    On re-read, this line jumped out at me. I had already grumbled with Roxor about the section about literature degrees -- maybe when his papers are posthumously published our emails will come to light! -- but I'm not sure this line struck me the same way:
    I think it is generally agreed, though, that game designers should be very familiar with the best games. Indeed, felipepepe might have words to say about that. Do we not think that Vault Dweller's broad experience with classic RPGs bore on the quality of AOD?

    Note that this is different from the argument that contemporary academic creative writing and literature courses don't actually cause you to "know a lot about literature." I understand Darth Roxor's point to apply even if the courses were not crazy deconstructionism and were instead the kind of old-school close textualism and analysis of say the 1940s and 50s.

    Also, it's tragic that the lag time for publishing this article is so long because the Tyranny jab really should be updated with the guys' admission that he doesn't actually read.]
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2017
    • Brofist x 22
    • Informative x 4
    • Interesting x 3
    • Agree x 2
    • meh x 2
    • Acknowledge this user's Agenda x 1
    • Edgy x 1
    ^ Top  
  5. I'm With Her SausageInYourFacegender: ⚧ for prison Arcane Patron

    SausageInYourFace
    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2013
    Parrots:
    2,017
    Location:
    In your face
    Divinity: Original Sin 2 BattleTech Bubbles In Memoria A Beautifully Desolate Campaign Pillars of Eternity 2: Deadfire
    Darth Roxor , how do you feel about the extensive use of rhetorical questions in long articles about good writing?
     
    • Brofist Brofist x 10
    • Funny Funny x 8
    • Acknowledge this user's Agenda Acknowledge this user's Agenda x 2
    • Salute Salute x 2
    ^ Top  
  6. Aeschylusgender: ⚧ Prestigious Gentleman Swindler Patron

    Aeschylus
    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2012
    Parrots:
    2,436
    Location:
    Phleebhut
    Divinity: Original Sin Project: Eternity Wasteland 2 Divinity: Original Sin 2
    Well, this was a good read. I'm not sure I entirely agree with all the things listed as 'causes', though I do largely see eye-to-eye on the examples of both good and bad writing in games. To me a lot of these newer games (PoE was a particular culprit here) just feel like reading novels written by first-time authors without an editor. Actually, that's probably pretty close to the truth of the situation.

    The main thing I took from it though is that my linguistics PhD would be better used for video game writing than research. :cool:
     
    • Brofist Brofist x 6
    ^ Top  
  7. I'm With Her oneselfgender: ⚧ for prison Prophet Shitposter

    oneself
    Joined:
    May 14, 2010
    Parrots:
    4,015
    Location:
    A minority-white, multicultural hellscape
    Who the fuck is he to complain about RPG writing? He's not even a RPG.
     
    • Funny x 13
    • butthurt x 4
    • Agree x 2
    • Brofist x 1
    • Acknowledge this user's Agenda x 1
    • Disagree x 1
    • Interesting x 1
    • it is a mystery x 1
    • Bad Spelling x 1
    • retadred x 1
    ^ Top  
  8. Make America Great Again Infinitrongender: ⚧ Trade Master Patron

    Infinitron
    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2011
    Parrots:
    63,778
    Codex 2016 - The Age of Grimoire Serpent in the Staglands Dead State Divinity: Original Sin Project: Eternity Torment: Tides of Numenera Wasteland 2 Shadorwun: Hong Kong Divinity: Original Sin 2 BattleTech A Beautifully Desolate Campaign Pillars of Eternity 2: Deadfire
    Yup, that second chapter is going to make a lot of people groan. Still, it's a common Codexian/Gamergatian viewpoint and it deserves to be aired eloquently.

    Mostly doesn't read the kind of overlong fantasy fiction excoriated by the article, though. :M
     
    • Acknowledge this user's Agenda Acknowledge this user's Agenda x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
    • meh meh x 1
    • :M :M x 1
    ^ Top  
  9. abnaxusgender: ⚧ Arcane

    abnaxus
    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2010
    Parrots:
    15,380
    Location:
    Carcosa
    It’s like the whole video game world is made up of incompetents, narcissists, sell-outs and conmen.
     
    • Agree x 3
    • Despair x 3
    • [citation needed] x 2
    • Interesting x 1
    • Informative x 1
    • :M x 1
    ^ Top  
  10. MRYgender: ⚧ Prestigious Gentleman Wormwood Studios Developer

    MRY
    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2012
    Parrots:
    2,939
    Location:
    California
    I don't think Roxor's articulation of it is particularly eloquent, though it may be forceful. :)

    Nope, mostly doesn't read anything (or at least any literature)."

    Giving him the generous benefit of the doubt, his "real life" and "human history" might refer to non-fiction, though I think it's fairly clear in context that he's referring to Cracked.com articles like "The 17 Zaniest CIA Plots You Never Heard Of" and "Bronze Age Warfare Was Batshit Crazy... and Hilarious!" and so on. But even still, he goes from non-fiction to games as his second influence, and makes clear that the reason he's skipping over literature is because "I'm not much of a reader." Since the interview didn't suggest to me false humility, we should probably take him at his word. It's true that he skips over crappy fantasy literature, but if you're making a historical RPG, you might read historical fiction, for example.

    [EDIT: Also, in a different interview, when asked what books influenced Tyranny the only book (series) he mentions is The Black Company, so... ¯\_(ツ)_/¯]
     
    • Informative x 4
    • Funny x 1
    • Rage x 1
    • Fabulously Optimistic x 1
    • Shit x 1
    ^ Top  
  11. CryptRatgender: ⚧ Arcane

    CryptRat
    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2014
    Parrots:
    1,498
    Very nice read, I agree with most of the text. Some comments :

    The thing is, to me the world being coherent or documented is far less important that the world building in a gameplay sense. The best worlds in recent games are in Legend Of Grimrock 2, Heroine's quest or Voidspire Tactics, and SiTs, and maybe SiTS excepted they're all constructed around gameplay and nothing else. It's utter annoying that developpers prioritize the narrative aspect of the world (and don't even succeed at making that aspect good).

    :salute:

    One thing that I never see mentioned here, personnally I really like the use of texts in games like Wasteland, Dragon Wars or Legend of Faerghail. Basically they are "tell, don't show" games for a big part, they use (I'd personally say well-written and very atmospheric) walls of text which describe a scene, then it's up to the player to figure out what to do (generally using an item or a skill), at least that's a gamey way to present texts, unlike clicking on a banal dialog choice.

    I generally hate dialogs with companions, seriousness, emotional engagement, and often heavy story at all. I think sometimes it completely breaks the fun, or at least the mystery or investigation aspects. But it's clearly a big point of disagreement when talking about well-written or not well-written games and clearly a reason why prefer Fallout to many other games praised for their writing like PS:T.

    :salute:
     
    • Brofist Brofist x 3
    ^ Top  
  12. Make America Great Again Kem0sabegender: ⚧ Arcane

    Kem0sabe
    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2011
    Parrots:
    9,169
    Location:
    The Bosom of the Holy Spirit
    Mediocrity plagues the genre, look at hacks like CmCc, hailed as one of the writers of Torment.

    Oathbreaker, Book 1: The Knight's Tale

    A lifetime of writing, and this degenerate can't come up with a single original story, he even names his knights... Knights Elite.

    Telling a good story in a game, is much more than simply writing text, it involves both artists, designers and writers, to setup a scene that pulls the player into the story that the game is telling, thats why The Witcher 3 managed to pull off some truly impressive story telling, or The Darkness adding some really impressive emotional scenes to the traditional shooter genre.
     
    • Brofist Brofist x 3
    • Prestigious Prestigious x 1
    ^ Top  
  13. Make America Great Again Infinitrongender: ⚧ Trade Master Patron

    Infinitron
    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2011
    Parrots:
    63,778
    Codex 2016 - The Age of Grimoire Serpent in the Staglands Dead State Divinity: Original Sin Project: Eternity Torment: Tides of Numenera Wasteland 2 Shadorwun: Hong Kong Divinity: Original Sin 2 BattleTech A Beautifully Desolate Campaign Pillars of Eternity 2: Deadfire
    MRY, you're pretty mean! The words "can only tolerate fantasy literature" seem suggestive of a particular antipathy towards that genre. I guess a valid interpretation if you think he's that much of a turbogeek is that fantasy literature is the only thing he would even consider reading and nothing else would ever even come to his mind.

    Well, more eloquent than most? Maybe he should have run it past Decado. :cool:
     
    ^ Top  
  14. MRYgender: ⚧ Prestigious Gentleman Wormwood Studios Developer

    MRY
    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2012
    Parrots:
    2,939
    Location:
    California
    A third of American men read no books a year.[1] Two thirds of American men read no fiction.[2] Against that backdrop, "I'm not much of a reader" and no mention of any literary influence suggests to me that he simply doesn't read fiction. I think he mentions fantasy because he assumes it's expected of him that he'd read fantasy if he were making fantasy RPGs. Anyway, abstaining from fiction is not a moral wrong -- in fact, it's practically a norm!

    My snarkiness about his non-fiction sources probably was mean, but the number of silly things that guy has said in marketing Tyranny merits a little bit of snark.
     
    • Agree x 4
    • Brofist x 3
    • Acknowledge this user's Agenda x 3
    • decline x 2
    • Salute x 2
    • Informative x 2
    • Rage x 1
    • Despair x 1
    ^ Top  
  15. ---gender: ⚧ Magister

    ---
    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2015
    Parrots:
    1,462
    Location:
    Shitaly
     
    • Brofist x 2
    • meh x 2
    • Despair x 2
    • Funny x 1
    • Agree x 1
    • Salute x 1
    • Interesting x 1
    • Informative x 1
    • Shit x 1
    ^ Top  
  16. MRYgender: ⚧ Prestigious Gentleman Wormwood Studios Developer

    MRY
    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2012
    Parrots:
    2,939
    Location:
    California
    Can't really judge a writer by that kind of a precis. My only objection is the use of "foresworn," which is contributing to the decline and fall of American letters, complete with an etymological red herring.[*] :shakesfist: I read a little of Colin's book and I thought that for a high fantasy sword-and-sorcery, it seemed well done, although I find the genre almost unbearable as a general matter these days.

    [* Oh no! Foresake? What's next? Foregive?!]
     
    • Funny Funny x 2
    • Agree Agree x 1
    • Salute Salute x 1
    ^ Top  
  17. Plane Escapeegender: ⚧ Your friend Patron

    Plane Escapee
    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2015
    Parrots:
    104
    Location:
    chair
    Divinity: Original Sin 2 BattleTech Bubbles In Memoria A Beautifully Desolate Campaign Pillars of Eternity 2: Deadfire
    Nice, I'm looking forward to reading this. Snippet looks promising.

    Infinitron you did a good job with the introductory text for this newspost. I thought I was reading from the article until "One of the most vocal figures in this counterreaction against modern RPG writing is distinguished Codex contributor Darth Roxor".
     
    • Agree Agree x 3
    • Thanks! Thanks! x 1
    ^ Top  
  18. pomenitulgender: ⚧ Learned

    pomenitul
    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2016
    Parrots:
    111
    Location:
    μεταβολή
    I've said this before, but it bears repeating. On the one hand, I can only sympathize with the call for avowable writing in CRPG's. On the other hand, anyone with a genuine interest in well-wrought fiction and diction would do best to suspend disbelief when playing video games or steer clear altogether, unless your goal is to transcend the entire medium from the ground up, in which case I salute your ill-fated endeavour.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
    • Shit Shit x 1
    ^ Top  
  19. I'm With Her SausageInYourFacegender: ⚧ for prison Arcane Patron

    SausageInYourFace
    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2013
    Parrots:
    2,017
    Location:
    In your face
    Divinity: Original Sin 2 BattleTech Bubbles In Memoria A Beautifully Desolate Campaign Pillars of Eternity 2: Deadfire
    Yeah, about that literature degree chapter..

    a) is a good point but to my mind the importance of b) is not as big as people on the interwebz presume it is.

    This whole part is kinda citiation needed-tier. Postmodernism is not all that relevant anymore in literature departments and it certainly isn't on the contemporary book market. Why its importance is sometimes so overemphasized probably has a lot to do with the politization on universities in recent years, when postmodern sensibilities became a strawman for the alt-right. Perhaps its more relevant in certain social science departments (genderstudieslol; which incidentally you mention, so thats probably where the argument comes from) but for literature, I don't think so, not when it comes to quality judgements.

    But that whole argument does not really matter because..

    ..that part is spot on. :salute:

    Postmodern induced absence of value judgements isn't needed to explain morons with a degree, yo.
     
    • Brofist Brofist x 2
    • retadred retadred x 2
    • Agree Agree x 1
    • Salute Salute x 1
    ^ Top  
  20. Lurker Kinggender: ⚧ Self-Ejected The Real Fanboy

    Self-Ejected
    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2015
    Parrots:
    1,865,419
    Does he quote passages from the new Torment? Please do!

    [​IMG]
     
    • Funny Funny x 4
    • retadred retadred x 1
    ^ Top  
  21. Make America Great Again Infinitrongender: ⚧ Trade Master Patron

    Infinitron
    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2011
    Parrots:
    63,778
    Codex 2016 - The Age of Grimoire Serpent in the Staglands Dead State Divinity: Original Sin Project: Eternity Torment: Tides of Numenera Wasteland 2 Shadorwun: Hong Kong Divinity: Original Sin 2 BattleTech A Beautifully Desolate Campaign Pillars of Eternity 2: Deadfire
    Thanks. I think of my writing as formulaic and mediocre, but I guess it's decent enough given my meager experience.

    A potential problem with the intro is that it makes it seem like the article is all about DEEP LORE. It isn't - it starts with that, but it's about much more than that. Which is a good thing, because I think people have overstated the importance of the whole "loredumping" thing to the exclusion of other, less easily conceptualized issues. It's a low-hanging fruit criticism, like complaining about the camera in NWN2 or boss fights in DX:HR. This article goes deeper than that and expands the conversation.
     
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2017
    • Salute Salute x 3
    • Brofist Brofist x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
    • Love! Love! x 1
    ^ Top  
  22. ---gender: ⚧ Magister

    ---
    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2015
    Parrots:
    1,462
    Location:
    Shitaly
    Of course he does!
     
    • Fabulously Optimistic Fabulously Optimistic x 1
    ^ Top  
  23. Glaucongender: ⚧ Learned

    Glaucon
    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2016
    Parrots:
    305
    Look through the course-list of any english department in America and you'll find dozens of classes devoted to postmodernism/deconstruction/post-historicism/critical theory/etc...but what I've noticed recently is that a lot of the kids in university now (and the younger faculty as well), are actually too dumb for deconstruction. The incredibly politically passionate, and they've memorized by rote the sentiments of all the fashionable (or once fashionable) french writers through professors/second literature--they just have no real, direct understanding of the texts. Maybe this is just my own experience at university, but I can't imagine their isn't a similar trend of mediocrity+politics going on elsewhere.
    The claim that humanities studies at universities has gone astray isn't a recent criticism by alt-righters--it's neither recent nor a criticism made exclusively by conservatives.
     
    • Agree Agree x 3
    • decline decline x 1
    • Despair Despair x 1
    ^ Top  
  24. ---gender: ⚧ Magister

    ---
    Joined:
    Dec 19, 2015
    Parrots:
    1,462
    Location:
    Shitaly
    Found particularly interesting the section in which Darth Roxor suggests the utilization of different fonts and graphics features, inspired by comic books and things like that.
     
    ^ Top  
  25. I'm With Her SausageInYourFacegender: ⚧ for prison Arcane Patron

    SausageInYourFace
    Joined:
    Dec 28, 2013
    Parrots:
    2,017
    Location:
    In your face
    Divinity: Original Sin 2 BattleTech Bubbles In Memoria A Beautifully Desolate Campaign Pillars of Eternity 2: Deadfire
    A class about postmodernism turns you into a postmodernist just as much as a class about victorianism turns you into a victorian.

    Yeah, that probably does make a difference.
     
    • Brofist Brofist x 2
    • Agree Agree x 1
    ^ Top  

(buying stuff via the above buttons helps us pay the hosting bills, thanks!)