Tacticular Cancer: We'll have your balls

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Let Us Read Miracleman (Sometimes NSFW, now with a tranny)

Discussion in 'Codex Public Library' started by Vaarna_Aarne, Dec 30, 2010.

  1. Vaarna_Aarne Ask me about anime Patron

    Vaarna_Aarne
    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2008
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    Location:
    Kalevalan Kankahilla
    MCA Project: Eternity Torment: Tides of Numenera Wasteland 2
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    So I guess I'll post this thing, since I already have it uploaded. Anyway, it's an Alan Moore comic that he started at the start of his career, and finished around the time of Watchmen. Neil Gaiman took over as Alan Moore wanted, and started the second series, but the publisher went bankcrupt. You probably haven't heard of it, or even seen a copy of an issue (issue 15 goes for hundreds of dollars on eBay), so here's why:

    At first Warrior published Miracleman under its original name Marvelman, but they got threatened with litigation by Marvel and the name was changed to Miracleman, Warrior goes out of business, Eclipse acquires the rights from Warrior's IP and starts publishing the series again in full color with Alan Moore writing new issues, Alan Moore testaments his share of the rights to Neil Gaiman, Eclipse goes bankcrupt, Todd MacFarlane purchased the rights from an auction, Neil Gaiman traded the rights Todd had to Miracleman for the creator rights on Angela and Cogliostro, Todd insists he still had Miracleman rights, Neil Gaiman sues him, Neil Gaiman writes 1602 for Marvel to finance the legal fund, turns out Dez Skinn (the head honcho of Warrior) never acquired the rights to Marvelman in the first place, which means no one had the rights in the first place, Todd MacFarlane gets sued by a hockey player, and then Marvel comics buys the supposed original rights from the creator of Marvelman. Riveting shit man.

    Anyway, I'll start posting the comic now, two issues per page.

    EDIT: Oh yeah, the latest in the Sage of Reprinting Miracleman is that it is highly possible the original creator of the character, Mick Anglo, didn't have rights to it either.
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  2. Vaarna_Aarne Ask me about anime Patron

    Vaarna_Aarne
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    Jun 1, 2008
    Messages:
    26,838
    Location:
    Kalevalan Kankahilla
    MCA Project: Eternity Torment: Tides of Numenera Wasteland 2
    Issue 1

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  3. Vaarna_Aarne Ask me about anime Patron

    Vaarna_Aarne
    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2008
    Messages:
    26,838
    Location:
    Kalevalan Kankahilla
    MCA Project: Eternity Torment: Tides of Numenera Wasteland 2
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  4. Orgasm Barely Literate

    Orgasm
    Joined:
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    Messages:
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    Wooow, really wow.

    I am not reading shitty writing with superhero characters and shitty art on top of that.

    What was the purpose of this retarded thread anyway? Do you wanna share how much you love this shit? Then dont fucking post the whole worthless comic. Post some of it and up the rest. Jesus, whats next?


    The Project Gutenberg EBook of Woodcraft, by E. H. (Elmer Harry) Kreps

    This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with
    almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or
    re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included
    with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org


    Title: Woodcraft

    Author: E. H. (Elmer Harry) Kreps

    Release Date: December 28, 2010 [EBook #34773]

    Language: English


    *** START OF THIS PROJECT GUTENBERG EBOOK WOODCRAFT ***




    Produced by Linda M. Everhart, Blairstown, Missouri








    WOODCRAFT
    By E. H. KREPS

    Published by
    PELTRIES PUBLISHING CO.
    Incorporated
    71 W. 23d Street, New York

    Copyright 1919 by
    Peltries Publishing Co., Inc.

    PREFACE.

    Elmer H. Kreps was born in Union county, Pa., in 1880. At that time
    large and small game of the various species common to Central
    Pennsylvania was plentiful in the neighborhood of his home. From his
    early boyhood he took a great interest in hunting and trapping. As he
    grew older he visited various parts of the United States and Canada,
    and being a keen observer, picked up a vast amount of information
    about life in the woods and fields.

    Mr. Kreps has written many articles on various subjects connected
    with hunting and trapping and this little booklet is a collection of
    Woodcraft articles from his pen. Mr. Kreps is an accomplished artist
    as well as writer, and the illustrations in Woodcraft are reproduced
    from his sketches.

    We feel sure that this collection of articles will prove of value to
    many men and boys who are interested in living in the woods and no
    one will be more happy than Mr. Kreps if his work helps brighten the
    life of trappers and hunters, in whom he is always interested.

    EDITOR FUR NEWS.



    BUILDING THE HOME CAMP

    The first camp I remember making, or remodeling, was an old lumber
    camp, one side of which I partitioned off and floored. It was clean
    and neat appearing, being made of boards, and was pleasant in warm
    weather, but it was cold in winter, so I put up an extra inside wall
    which I covered with building paper. Then I learned the value of a
    double wall, with an air space between, a sort of neutral ground
    where the warmth from the inside could meet the cold from without,
    and the two fight out their differences. In this camp I had a brick
    stove with a sheet iron top, and it worked like a charm.

    But that was not really a wilderness camp, and while I realize that
    in many of the trapping districts where it is necessary to camp,
    there are often these deserted buildings to be found, those who trap
    or hunt in such places are not the ones who must solve the real
    problems of camp building. It is something altogether different when
    we get far into the deep, silent forest, where the sound of the axe
    has never yet been heard, and sawed lumber is as foreign as a linen
    napkin in a trapper's shack. But the timber is there, and the trapper
    has an ax and the skill and strength to use it, so nothing more is
    really needed. Let us suppose we are going to build a log cabin for a
    winter's trapping campaign. While an axe is the only tool necessary,
    when two persons work together, a narrow crosscut saw is a great
    labor-saver, and if it can be taken conveniently the trappers or camp
    builders will find that it will more than pay for the trouble. Other
    things very useful in this work are a hammer, an auger, a pocket
    measuring tape, and a few nails, large, medium and small sizes. Then
    to make a really pleasant camp a window of some kind must be
    provided, and for this purpose there is nothing equal to glass.

    Right here a question pops up before us. We are going on this trip
    far back into the virgin forest, and the trail is long and rough; how
    then can we transport an unwieldy crosscut saw and such fragile stuff
    as glass? We will remove the handles from the saw and bind over the
    tooth edge a grooved strip of wood. This makes it safe to carry, and
    while still somewhat unhandy it is the best we can do, for we cannot
    shorten its length. For the window, we will take only the glass--six
    sheets of eight by ten or ten by fourteen size. Between each sheet we
    place a piece of corrugated packing board, and the whole is packed in
    a case, with more of the same material in top and bottom. This makes
    a package which may be handled almost the same as any other
    merchandise, and we can scarcely take into the woods anything that
    will give greater return in comfort and satisfaction.

    If we are going to have a stove in this cabin we will also require a
    piece of tin or sheet iron about 18 inches square, to make a safe
    stovepipe hole, but are we going to have a stove or a fireplace? Let
    us consider this question now.

    On first thought the fireplace seems the proper thing, for it can be
    constructed in the woods where the camp is made, but a fireplace so
    made may or may not be satisfactory. If we know the principles of
    proper fireplace construction we can make one that will not smoke the
    camp, will shed the proper amount of heat, and will not consume more
    fuel than a well-behaved fireplace should, but if one of these
    principles be violated, trouble is sure to result. Moreover, it is
    difficult to make a neat and satisfactory fireplace without a hammer
    for dressing the stones, and a tool of this kind will weigh as much
    as a sheet iron stove, therefore it is almost as difficult to take
    into the woods. Then there is one or two days' work, perhaps more, in
    making the fireplace and chimney, with the added uncertainty of its
    durability, for there are only a few kinds of stones that will stand
    heat indefinitely without cracking. On the other hand the fireplace
    renders the use of a lamp unnecessary, for it will throw out enough
    light for all ordinary needs.

    The good points of the stove are that it can be made by anybody in a
    half day's time; it does not smoke the camp, does not black the
    cooking utensils, gives the maximum amount of heat from the minimum
    quantity of fuel, and will not give out or go bad unexpectedly in the
    middle of the winter. If you leave it to me our camp will be equipped
    with a sheet iron stove. While the stove itself is not now to be
    considered, we must know before we commence to build what form of
    heating and cooking apparatus will be installed.

    Having decided on which part of the country is to be the centre of
    operations, we look for a suitable site for our cabin. We find it
    near a stream of clear water. Nearby is a stretch of burned land
    covered thinly with second growth saplings, and near the edge of the
    evergreen forest in which we will build our camp stands plenty of
    dead timber, tamarack, white spruce, and a few pine stubs, all of
    which will make excellent firewood. In the forest itself we find
    straight spruce trees, both large and small, balsam, and a few white
    birches, the loose bark of which will make the best kindling known.
    Within three rods of the stream and 50 yards from the burn is a rise
    of ground, high enough to be safe from the spring freshets, and of a
    gravelly ground which is firm and dry. This is the spot on which we
    will construct our cabin, for here we have good drainage, shelter
    from the storms, water and wood near at hand, and material for the
    construction of the camp right on the spot.

    [Illustration: CHART SHOWING LOCATION OF CAMP.]

    The first thing to settle is the size of the proposed building. Ten
    by fourteen feet, inside measurement, is a comfortable size for a
    home cabin for two men. If it were to be used merely as a stopping
    camp now and then it should be much smaller, for the small shack is
    easier warmed and easier to build. I have used camps for this purpose
    measuring only six and a half by eight feet, and found them plenty
    large for occasional use only. But this cabin is to be our
    headquarters, where we will store our supplies and spend the stormy
    days, so we will make it ten by fourteen feet. There is just one spot
    clear of trees where we can place a camp of this size, and we
    commence here felling trees from which to make logs for the walls.
    With the crosscut saw we can throw the straight spruce trees almost
    anywhere we want them, and we drop them in places which will be
    convenient and save much handling. As soon as a tree is cut we
    measure it off and saw it into logs. These must be cut thirteen and
    seventeen feet long, and as they will average a foot in diameter at
    the stump there will be an allowance of three feet for walls and
    overlap, or 18 inches at each end. We cut the trees as near the
    ground as we can conveniently, and each tree makes two or three logs.
    All tall trees standing near the camp site must be cut, and used if
    possible, for there is always danger that a tree will blow over on
    the camp some time, if within reach.

    On the spot chosen for the camp we now place two of the long logs,
    parallel with each other and exactly ten feet apart. We block them on
    the outside so they cannot be moved easily out of position. Then we
    place two of the short logs across the ends and in these we cut
    half-round notches directly over the places where they rest on the
    long logs, and almost half through each piece. After cutting these
    notches we turn the logs notched side down, and these cuts, if they
    have been properly done, fit snugly over the long logs, thus binding
    the four pieces together and forming the first round of the walls.

    [Illustration: THE CORNER CONSTRUCTION.]

    Before going farther now we must decide just where we are going to
    have the doorway of our cabin. We will place it on the south side,
    for we like to have the warm sun rays come in when the door is open,
    and if placed on the north or west sides it admits too much cold. We
    will place it near one end and then we can also put our window in the
    same side. About two or three feet from the corner we will cut out a
    section from the top of the log, making the cut four inches deep and
    two and a half feet wide, the bottom being hewn smooth and the ends
    sawed down square. Then we cut one of the balsam trees and saw a
    section from the butt the length of the proposed doorway. This should
    be not less than five feet, so we make it this length. Then we split
    through the centre with the axe and a pair of wooden wedges, and hew
    the two halves into two smooth planks. We also make a plank two and a
    half feet long. When these planks are finished we stand the two long
    ones upright in the place cut in the log and nail them firmly. We see
    that they stand perfectly plumb and in line with one another, then we
    nail the short plank across the top, thus completing our doorway. On
    this side, as the walls are laid up, we saw each log off squarely at
    the proper place and push it up against the door frame, fastening it
    there by nailing through the plank. The notches are cut to such a
    depth at the corners that the logs fit one against the other and this
    leaves no large cracks to close.

    To make our cabin comfortable it must have a floor and we have this
    in mind as we work. Before building the wall higher we will lay our
    sills for the floor, for it is difficult to get these cut to the
    proper length and fitted in place after the walls are completed and
    the timber must be brought in through the doorway. We cut three
    straight logs about eight inches thick in the middle and 14 feet
    long. These are bedded into the ground in the cabin, one along each
    side wall and the other in the centre. They must be placed at an even
    height and this is determined by means of a straight ten-foot pole,
    which when placed across these logs should rest on each. If one of
    them is too high in spots we dress these places down with the axe.

    We will now leave the floors and proceed with building the walls.
    Round by round the logs are notched and fitted into place, until the
    walls have reached a height of about four feet. Then we make a window
    boxing of planks and fasten it in the wall in the same way we did the
    door frame. The ends of the logs are butted against the window frame
    and fastened with large nails, driven through the planks into the
    logs. But before making the window frame the size of the proposed
    window must be determined, and this is done by measuring the width of
    the glass and making the proper allowance for the sash. When the logs
    are placed in the walls we try to select timbers of such a size that
    one round of logs will come within about three inches of the top of
    the window boxing, and the next log is cut out to fit down over this
    window and the frame is nailed fast to this log. The same thing is
    done when the top of the door frame is reached, and this gives a
    greater degree of rigidity to the walls.

    [Illustration: THE GABLES.]

    When the walls have been raised to a height of about six and a half
    feet above the floor sills we commence work on the gables. These are
    constructed by placing a full length log across the end, a shorter
    one on top of this, continuing thus until high enough. This is best
    done by setting a pole up in the end of the camp exactly in the
    middle of the end wall, the top being just the height of the proposed
    gable. From the top of this straight pole, poles are run down to each
    corner and these give the slope of the gables, also of the roof. The
    logs are then cut off on an incline at the ends to conform with the
    line of this pole, and are fastened one on top of another by boring
    holes and driving wooden pins into them. When both gables have been
    raised to half their height we cut two 17-foot binding poles, each
    six inches thick in the middle, and notch them into the logs of the
    gables. These logs or poles not only give more stability to the
    gables, but they also make a support for the roof, and are a nice
    foundation for a loft on which to store articles after the camp is
    finished. When the ends are brought up to within about eight inches
    of the required height a stout, straight ridge pole of the same
    length as the binding poles is placed on top, and notched lightly
    into the top log.

    Our camp is now ready for the roof, and what are we to use for this
    most important part. I have no doubt that camp roofs have caused more
    gray hairs for woodsmen than any of the other problems they have to
    solve. If it were early summer when the bark could be peeled from
    cedar and spruce trees we would have no trouble, but bark is not
    available now. About the only style of roof that we can make now is
    what is called a scoop roof, made from split logs. We must find a
    straight-grained, free-splitting wood for this, and of the woods at
    hand we find balsam the best, so we cut balsam trees about eight or
    ten inches in diameter, and make logs from the butt of each, about
    seven feet long, so that they will reach from the top of the
    ridge-pole to the walls and extend a foot beyond. These we split
    through the centre and hollow out each in a trough form, by cutting
    notches in the flat side, without cutting the edges, and splitting
    out the sections between. We place a layer of these the entire length
    of the roof, hollow side up, and notch each in place so that it
    cannot slip or rock. Between each set of these troughs we will place
    a three-inch pole, and on top of the pole we place marsh moss. Then
    we place over these poles a second layer of the troughs, hollow side
    down, and over the ridge pole we place a large, full-length trough.
    This latter we must make by hewing a log flat on one side and then
    hollowing it out, for we cannot find a tree with such a straight
    grain that we can split a 17-foot length without more or less of a
    twist.

    [Illustration: THE ROOF.]

    Before completing our roof, in fact when the first layer of scoops
    are placed on, we must make provision for our stove pipe, for it must
    have an outlet through the roof, and the location the stove is to
    have in the cabin must be determined. A hole 12 or 14 inches square
    is left in the roof, by using a few short scoops, and this hole is
    covered with the sheet of tin we brought for the purpose, and a
    slightly oblong hole is cut in this for the stove pipe. The edge of
    this hole we turn up with the hammer, which makes it waterproof, and
    when finished it is such a size that the pipe makes a snug fit. The
    whole thing is so arranged that water cannot run under from the top,
    but this is difficult to explain.

    A roof like this causes a lot of work, in fact as much as the
    remainder of the camp in some cases, but if carefully made it is a
    good roof, warm and waterproof. It must be well mossed or snow will
    sift in, and the lower ends of the troughs, from where they cross the
    walls, should be cut deeper than the portion above. If this is not
    done the ice which forms in the ends of these troughs will back the
    water up until it runs over the edges and down the walls of the
    cabin. It may even be necessary occasionally during the winter to
    clean the snow off the lower edge of the roof and clip the ice from
    the troughs with a hatchet. The steeper the roof the less trouble
    there will be from this source.

    With the roof completed our cabin becomes a real shelter and we can
    camp inside at night. If necessary the flooring may be postponed for
    a few days, but we may as well finish it at once, so we clean out the
    chips and commence laying the floor. This we make of straight spruce
    poles about four or five inches thick. In the end of the camp where
    our beds are to be we leave them in their natural round state, merely
    flattening them on the underside where they rest on the sills, to
    make them fit and lie firmly in their places. But when the floor has
    grown at this end to a width of about four feet we adopt a different
    plan. We now hew the poles straight and smooth on one side their
    entire length, and flatten the underside where they rest on the
    sills, also straighten the sides so they fit up snugly against one
    another. At the place where the stove is to be placed we leave an
    opening of two and a half by four feet, and around this place we
    fasten smooth pieces of wood about four inches thick, so that it
    makes of the opening a sort of box. When our floor is completed we
    nail down along each wall, a pole, which covers the ends of the floor
    poles and holds them all firmly in place.

    [Illustration: THE DOOR.]

    To complete our cabin now we need only a door, a window, and
    something to close the cracks. For a door we split cedar or balsam
    wood into planks, which we place on edge in notches cut in a log, and
    hew down smoothly on both sides with the axe. Then we straighten the
    edges and measuring our door frame carefully we fit the boards into
    the opening, binding them all together by nailing across near each
    end a narrow board. We also place a strip diagonally across the door
    from near one corner to the opposite, to stiffen the door and prevent
    warping. Hinges we make of wood, fasten them together with a single
    large nail through each, and fasten the door to the wall. Then on the
    outside we hew the ends of the logs until they are flush with the
    edges of the door frame, and nail a flattened strip along both sides
    of the doorway. This is not absolutely necessary, but it gives the
    doorway a more finished appearance, and increases the rigidity of the
    wall.

    Our window sash also makes considerable work. For this we split soft,
    dead cedar and hew it into three-inch strips. From these we make a
    frame that will fit inside the window boxing, and make the strips of
    this frame flush at the corners by cutting away half of each. Then at
    the proper places we fit our lighter cross strips, sinking them into
    the wood at the ends, and fastening with small nails. Grooves are
    then cut in the strips and the frame itself to receive the sheets of
    glass, which are put in place and fastened with tacks. The window is
    then placed in the wall and secured by nailing narrow strips of wood
    against it. As a window at its best is apt to admit a lot of cold air
    it will pay well to spend some time at this work and make the window
    fit snugly.

    All that now remains to be done is to close the cracks between the
    logs. Since our logs were of a uniform size and have been well
    notched down there are no large cracks, and no blocking is needed.
    The warmest chinking, outside of rags, which we do not have, is woods
    moss. That found growing on rocks and logs is best, for it does not
    dry out and shrink as much as marsh moss, and there is an abundance
    of this near at hand. We gather a few bags of this moss and with a
    piece of wood we drive it into the cracks all around the walls. We
    also keep a small quantity of this moss in the cabin, for no matter
    how firmly it is driven into the cracks it will shrink and become
    loose after awhile, and this must be tightened and more moss driven
    in.

    Our little cabin is now complete. It has taken much hard work to
    build it, but it is worth the effort for it is a comfortable,
    home-like camp. The cold winter winds may howl through the forest and
    the snow may fall to a depth of several feet, but here we can live as
    comfortably as woodsmen can expect to live in the wilds.



    FURNISHING THE HOME CAMP

    A single day's work will do wonders towards making a cabin
    comfortable. Sometimes through press of more important work, such as
    getting out a line of traps while the season is yet young, the
    trapper may well neglect these touches of comfort, and the simplest
    of camp furnishings will answer until a stormy day keeps him indoors,
    when he can make good use of his time in making camp furniture. A bed
    and a stove or fireplace are the only absolutely necessary
    furnishings to start with, if other work demands immediate attention.

    But in our own case such neglect is not at all necessary. The
    preceding chapter saw our cabin completed, that is the walls, roof
    and floor, all that can really be called cabin, but much more work
    will be required before it is really comfortable and ready for
    occupancy. Providing the camp with suitable furniture and adding
    conveniences and comfort is the next step, so while we have time and
    there is nothing to hinder the work we will push it along.

    Most important of all camp furnishings is the stove. Nothing else
    adds so much to the cheerfulness and home-like aspect of a camp as a
    properly enclosed, well behaved fire, which warms up the room,
    enables us to cook our food indoors, and dispenses the gloom of night
    by driving the darkness into the farthest corners. If the weather is
    cold nothing in the camp is so indispensable.

    For the lodge which we built in the preceding chapter we will make a
    stove of sheet iron. I have made a number of camp stoves by riveting
    together four sections of new, unbent stovepipe into a square sheet,
    bending this into proper shape, fitting ends, and cutting holes for
    cooking utensils and for the pipe. But for this camp we have secured
    from a hardware store a pipe of sheet iron three feet wide by four
    feet long. We now place this on the floor of the cabin and measure
    off from each end 17 inches, then on each edge at the 17-inch mark we
    make a three-inch cut. This we do by holding the sheet metal on a
    block or flat topped stump, placing the corner of the axe on the
    metal at the proper place, and striking on the head with a billet of
    wood. Then we place a straight edged strip of wood across the end on
    the 17-inch mark, and standing on this wood we pull the end of the
    metal upward, bending it to a right angle. The other end is treated
    the same way and this leaves the metal in the form of a box, three
    feet long, 17 inches high, and 14 inches wide, open on top and at
    both ends. Now we turn this upside down and in the top we cut two
    seven-inch holes, as round as we can make them. These are to hold the
    cooking utensils. Near one end we cut a small hole, not more than
    three and a half inches in diameter. The edge of this hole we cut at
    intervals all the way around, making straight, one-half inch cuts.
    Then we turn these edges up, and we have a stovepipe hole, with a
    collar to hold the pipe in place. We now close the rear end of the
    stove by bending three inches of the sides into a right angle, the
    same amount of the top being bent down. This is the purpose of the
    three-inch cuts we made when we first commenced the work. Now we
    rivet a piece of sheet-iron into this end, using for rivets the head
    ends of wire nails. They must be cut short and riveted on the head of
    an axe. Beneath the top of the stove, between the cooking holes we
    rivet a folded strip of metal; this is to stiffen the top. Then we
    turn in three inches of the front of the stove and rivet the corners
    where they lap. This leaves an eight-inch opening in front over which
    we will hinge a door. This door must have some kind of fastening, and
    a simple little twist of wire working in a punch hole is easily
    arranged and convenient. We can make a very crude stove of this if we
    like, but we do not want that kind, so we take plenty of time and
    turn out a satisfactory article.

    Our stove is now completed except for the covers which are easily
    made. We set it up in the box-shaped opening left in the floor and
    fill around it with sand to a height of six inches, also fill the
    inside to that height. While doing this we must see that the stove
    stands perfectly level, and that the pipe hole is directly beneath
    the hole in the roof. This makes a fireproof stove and the bed of
    sand holds it rigidly in place. A draft is made beneath the door by
    scraping away a little sand. The pipe is five-inch size and we fit it
    with a damper for that is the way to regulate the draft and keep the
    heat from going up the pipe.

    [Illustration: THE STOVE.]

    Our stove completed and in working order we next turn our attention
    to the bed, since it ranks second in importance. We set an upright
    post four inches thick and three feet long against the sidewall about
    five feet from the end of the room and nail it firmly in position.
    Then at a height of about two feet from the floor we fasten to the
    wall another four-inch piece, this extending in a horizontal position
    from the post to the end wall. Then we set up a corner post at the
    foot of the bed, placing it five feet from the end wall and nailing
    the top securely to the roof binding pole. In line with this against
    the end wall we set up another three-foot post and spike it solidly
    to the logs of the wall. Then we cut notches in these two latter
    posts two feet above the floor and into this we fit and nail fast a
    four-inch cross strip. We now have the foundation for our bed and we
    make the bottom of straight, smooth poles, nailed fast to the
    horizontal ends. These poles must all be of about the same thickness
    to make a satisfactory bed, otherwise some of them will bend or
    spring while the stiff ones will not. If it were summer now we would
    line this bunk with bark to keep the balsam needles from falling
    through, but since we cannot get bark at this time of year we cannot
    do this. We make the side and end of the bed by nailing poles against
    the posts. Then we fill the bed with balsam boughs. These are the
    ends of the branches and the heaviest stems are less than a
    fourth-inch thick. We commence at the head and stand the boughs on
    end at an angle, stems down. When entirely filled we have a soft and
    fairly comfortable bed, of course not equal to the spring bed we have
    at home, but then we are not expecting home comforts in the big
    woods, and we are always tired enough to rest well in a bough bed.
    For pillows we use grain bags in which we place our extra clothing.

    This bed is at its best when freshly filled. Each night's use reduces
    its softness, and the comfort decreases at a like rate. The only way
    to keep a bough bed in good condition is to replace the bough filling
    occasionally with fresh evergreens. When we kill some big game
    animal, a deer or caribou, we will dry the skin and place it on our
    bed, hair side up, for this will make the bed warmer and softer.

    The table is next in order. Many trappers think a table too much of a
    luxury and accordingly dispense with it, but a home camp is far from
    complete without it and it is an easy piece of furniture to make. It
    should be placed on the south side of the cabin before the window, so
    that we can get the advantage of the light. We will stand up two
    posts of the proper height about two feet from the wall and six feet
    apart. These we secure in place by nailing them to the floor. From
    the tops of these posts to the wall we place flattened pieces of wood
    and secure them by nailing to the wall and to the posts. This is the
    foundation or framework for our table. The top we will make of three
    straight eight-inch logs hewn on one side to the center, and
    flattened on the other side at the ends. When placed on the supports,
    flat side up, and fastened by nailing at the ends, we have the table
    completed. It is rough, but it answers our purpose as well as a more
    finished one.

    [Illustration: CAMP FURNITURE.]

    In front of the table we will place a bench. This we will make from a
    hewn log, half round, and in the round side near each end we bore
    holes for the legs. These are bored at such an angle that the legs
    will stand about 20 inches apart at the base. The legs are made of
    two-inch sticks whittled to fit the holes and driven in, the lower
    ends being cut off afterwards at the proper length to make the bench
    stand firmly, and at the right height. We will also make another
    shorter bench which we will place by the side of the stove. Perhaps
    when a stormy day comes we will make a couple of chairs, but for the
    present at least these two benches will serve very well.

    We cannot be long in the woods until we realize the need of some
    means of securing our food where it will be inaccessible to woods
    mice. These little creatures are a serious pest and can soon ruin a
    bag of flour or a side of bacon if they are able to get at it. In an
    effort to place my flour where they could not reach it I suspended it
    from the ridgepole with a piece of codfish line, but the nimble mice
    went up and down that cord like monkeys. Then I made a platform and
    suspended it from the roof with four pieces of hay baling wire. On
    this I placed my food; but even here I found it was not safe, for the
    mice dropped onto the platform from the roof poles. The only way I
    found that was perfectly satisfactory was to make a tight box with a
    well fitted cover in which to keep the food supply. As a result I
    made a food box for each camp.

    We have now found that it is necessary to have some means of
    preserving our food from the ravages of mice, and profiting by
    experience we do not waste our time on theories, but set to work to
    make a tight wooden box. If it were a time of the year when bark
    would peel we would make a frame of poles and cover it with bark. But
    this is impossible now, so we split boards from balsam and cedar and
    hew them flat and smooth. For the ends we make these boards two feet
    long and fasten them together by nailing strips across the ends of
    the boards after they have been placed side by side with the edges
    fitting one against another. The boards for the bottom and sides are
    made three feet long and these we nail to the ends. The cover is
    fitted to the top, but is not fastened.

    Luxuries become necessities through use. The furnishings which we
    have so far brought into our cabin may be considered as coming
    properly under the heading of necessities. But there are many little
    extra pieces that may be added which may be called luxuries at first,
    but through use they become almost indispensable. On the walls we
    will build shelves and we find them very useful places for storing
    odds and ends. A small shelf is placed on the wall near the stove to
    hold the lamp, and another similar shelf for the same purpose is
    placed above the left end of the table. Then there are two or three
    longer shelves placed in convenient locations. These shelves are all
    made of hewn boards supported by stout pins driven into auger holes.

    If we are not by this time too tired of making boards with an axe, we
    will make a wooden tub in which to wash our clothes. Since we have a
    saw this is not as difficult as it first appears. It is made square
    with sloping sides. The boards must be carefully fitted and securely
    nailed. Then, after we have made it as tight as possible by nailing
    we will gather a small quantity of spruce gum and run it into the
    cracks from the inside by means of a hot iron, in much the same way
    that we would solder tin plate. A wash basin can be made in the same
    way, but we have a tin basin in our outfit so we'll not need to make
    one.

    Behind the stove we nail a slender pole, horizontally, onto wooden
    pins driven into auger holes, so that the pole is parallel with the
    wall and about six or eight inches from it. On this pole we place our
    socks and mitts to dry when we come in from the day's tramp. We hang
    our coats on nails driven into the wall. Our snowshoes we suspend
    from the roof with snare wire in the coolest part of the camp, so
    that the mice cannot eat the filling or the heat make it brittle.

    Perhaps you would be interested in our camp outfit, for it is adapted
    to use in a camp of this kind. We have come into the woods for the
    fall and winter, and while we will go out occasionally for supplies
    of food, our outfit is supposed to be complete, and in it are all the
    articles needed for an entire winter's stay in the wilds. The
    following are the articles which we have brought with us as camp
    outfit: Two rabbit skin blankets, two large all-wool blankets, one
    large and one medium enameled kettle, two tea pails, one water pail,
    one large frying pan and two small ones, with sockets for handles,
    three enameled plates, two enameled cups, two table knives, two
    forks, two table spoons, two tea spoons, one reflecting baker, one
    wash basin, one small mirror, four towels, one alarm clock, one small
    oil lamp (bottom portion of a railroad lantern), three small axes
    with long handles, one cross-cut saw, one hand saw, two flat files,
    two sharpening stones (pocket size), one auger, one hammer, assorted
    nails, a dozen small bags for holding food, a small box of medicines,
    and a repair kit, consisting of needles, thread, wax, scissors, awl
    and small pliers.

    The above is the actual camp outfit and does not include personal
    belongings, such as guns, traps, toilet articles, compasses clothing,
    snowshoes, etc., things which are used more on the trail than in
    camp, and while necessary in our business cannot rightfully be
    considered a part of the camp equipment. Even some of the articles
    mentioned, for instance the two small frying pans, are more for use
    on the trail than in the home cabin.

    This, and the preceding chapter, describe what to my mind is an ideal
    camp for two persons and a perfect equipment for same. The camp site
    described could not be improved upon, and it is seldom that we find
    all of the requirements in any one place, yet the description is that
    of one of my own camp sites, and except for the size of camp and a
    few details of furnishings and outfit, also describes one of my
    cabins, one which I constructed and used while trapping in Canada.



    OUTDOOR FOODS

    That foods for outdoor men should differ from those eaten by people
    who work indoors may appear strange to some of us, but it is a fact
    that foods of the same class are not, as a rule, practical for both
    outdoor and indoor consumption. The requirements of people who work
    in the open air differ but little from those of the indoor workers,
    but it is mainly the source of supply that necessitates a different
    class of foods.

    The indoor man lives in the midst of plenty. Almost anything his
    appetite demands he may have. The telephone makes it unnecessary for
    him to go to the store to place his order and the delivery man brings
    the goods to his back door. His better half or perhaps a hired cook,
    prepares the food for him and he need not even worry about the time
    required for cooking or the work necessary to prepare and place the
    viands before him.

    But with the outdoor man, by which I mean woodsman and others who are
    employed outdoors and do their own cooking far from a base of
    supplies, the conditions are altogether different. Perhaps the outer
    has carried his food a long distance on his back or it may have been
    brought to his camp in a boat or canoe, or by team over a long and
    rough road, or even packed on horseback from 50 to 100 miles into the
    rough mountains. In either case it was necessary for him to select
    foods having certain qualities. In order to keep the bulk and weight
    down to a reasonable level all bulky, heavy, watery foods had to be
    eliminated. Such foods as would freeze in cold weather, decay, become
    rancid, or otherwise spoil if kept a long time without special care,
    had to be kept out of the list. Also such articles as do not contain
    much nutriment must be avoided, as well as those which are apt to
    prove harmful when used regularly. Not only that, but the entire
    outfit of food must be "well balanced," that is, it must have about
    the right proportions of the various food elements required by the
    human body. Too much salt pork and other preserved foods, with too
    little fresh food, may cause scurvy; various articles which are known
    to be difficult of digestion may cause chronic dyspepsia, while many
    constipating foods may in a different way lead to the same trouble.
    In addition nothing should be taken which is difficult to transport
    or apt to get broken and cause trouble while en route.

    To sum it all up, the requirements in outdoor foods that are to be
    taken some distance to camp are as follows: First, reasonably light
    weight and small bulk; second, good keeping qualities; third, a high
    per cent. of nutrition; fourth, balance and total absence of
    injurious properties; fifth, adaptability to packing and
    transportation requirements. We might add to this the quality of
    being quickly and easily prepared, for, while this is not required in
    all of the food, it is necessary for all outdoor men to have a number
    of articles which may be prepared on short notice.

    Breakfast in the woods is usually an early meal, in winter being
    invariably eaten before daylight, and this requires either quickly
    prepared foods or very early rising. Often, too, the woodsman comes
    in from a tramp long after dark. He has had a long, hard journey,
    perhaps having had only a lunch since daybreak, maybe not even that,
    and the cold, along with the exertion, has given him a marvelous
    appetite. On such occasions every minute that can be gained in
    cooking a nourishing meal is that much to the good. But short-order
    meals are not the thing for regular fare, for in time they will ruin
    any stomach.

    Considering the first requisite, light weight and little bulk, we may
    include in our list as meeting these requirements, all kinds of dried
    fruits, vegetables, and meats, tea, coffee and condensed foods. Fresh
    vegetables and fruits are excluded from the list, for they are heavy
    and bulky and fail also in the second requirement, for they freeze
    easily in cold weather and sometimes do not keep well when it is
    warm. To make up for the lack of fresh fruits and vegetables we must
    take plenty of the dry kind, and it is also a good plan to have in
    the outfit a bottle of vinegar or fruit juice--lime juice is an
    excellent tonic for use in the woods and is a sure preventative of
    scurvy. Vegetables and fruit in tin or glass are also prohibitive
    except in a small way, as, for instance, the fruit juice, vinegar,
    pickles and condensed milk, all of which may be taken in small
    quantities. In general, however, canned goods should be avoided
    unless the trip is made by wagon or other means that does not
    prohibit taking heavy goods, in which case a quantity of food in tins
    may be taken. Eggs and other ultra-perishable goods are strictly
    prohibited. The taking of eggs and food in glass also violates
    requisite number five, for all such articles require far more care in
    handling than is practical on the bush trail.

    Not only does the woodsman have to consider cooking and eating in
    camp but he must think as well of the many days that he will spend on
    the trail and there his food must be of the most condensed, light,
    nutritious and otherwise perfect form. He must therefore take with
    him to his home camp sufficient of this quality of food to fill his
    needs when he makes his long trips away from camp over the trap line
    or elsewhere, but always carrying with him his equipment and food for
    the trip.

    A man can depend to some extent on game and fish, but if he is going
    far back into the wilderness where he cannot retreat in a day or two
    to civilization and a source of food supply he should be very sure
    that the game and fish are actually found in the place where he is
    going, that such game and fish will be available at all seasons, and
    that there will be no uncommon difficulty in securing it. Some kinds
    of big game animals migrate periodically or spasmodically; fish are
    sometimes hard to find in winter, and the hunting equipment may for
    one reason or another go wrong. For instance, the capsizing of a
    canoe may mean the loss of the only gun or all the ammunition in the
    party, and even a broken gun mainspring may cause great hardship. Of
    course a resourceful and expert woodsman would not starve even if
    turned adrift in the forest without food or gun, but few care to make
    the experiment or to risk going hungry. Therefore I advise taking
    enough food, so that it will not be necessary to depend on game. If
    there is game to be had it should, of course, be secured, for fresh
    meat is a great relief from the everlasting bacon and bannock and it
    tends to neutralize the constipating properties of such food. It is
    possible for one to live indefinitely on fresh meat and fish alone if
    forced to it; but the civilized appetite does not accept gracefully
    any such radical departures from what has now become the natural line
    of food. Moreover, the man who elects to live on game and fish alone
    must of necessity go hungry for long periods, in fact may be forced
    to face starvation when game is scarce and for one reason or another
    difficult to secure. Therefore the woodsman should not attempt to
    live wholly on fresh meat or to make so much allowance for game that
    he will suffer from hunger if the game is not procurable. No such
    sacrifice should be made merely to reduce the weight of the outfit.

    Coming now to the matter of keeping qualities we find that any of the
    evaporated, dried or condensed foods on the market meet all
    requirements. Bacon, cured for winter use, may not remain in a
    perfectly sweet condition, and it is well to make sure before
    purchasing that the meat is well salted and smoked. Butter may become
    strong unless the weather is cold, but I have found that first-class
    creamery butter will keep nicely for a period of two and a half
    months in fairly cold weather. For a longer trip canned butter should
    be procured. It may be purchased in Canada from almost any grocer
    located in an outfitting point. While potatoes and other fresh
    vegetables are prohibited because of weight and bulk they are also
    eliminated from the list because they freeze in cold weather. A
    trapper must often be away from camp for a period of time varying
    from a few days to a week or more and anything that can freeze will
    surely do so in one night of "40 below" weather. As an exception to
    this rule I advise taking a few onions, for in spite of their weight
    they are a food worth considering. They freeze as readily as
    potatoes, but if they are kept frozen until time for use it will not
    hurt them in the least. There are many dishes that are greatly
    improved by an onion flavor and I am very fond of this evil-smelling
    vegetable when sliced and fried with steak. Ordinary canned goods
    containing water are tabooed in cold weather, for they freeze and
    burst the cans, besides falling short in the first requirement of
    camp foods, namely, light weight.

    Nutrition in foods is a quality which needs but little expenditure of
    gray matter if one does not attempt to live a long period on an
    unvaried line. By taking a variety of foods and changing the menu
    frequently danger from lack of nutriment is reduced to the minimum.
    Condensed and dried foods are invariably very nutritious. With fresh
    meat occasionally the foods which I recommend will meet all
    requirements in this particular.

    What has been said on the subject of nutrition in camp foods will
    suffice for the fourth requisite--perfect balance and lack of
    injurious elements. While I would not advise the use of one or two
    articles of food as a steady diet the kind I name in the lists given
    herewith, if used in the proportions given and a little fresh meat or
    fish can be sandwiched in here and there, no bad results will follow.
    On the other hand, if any of the articles, or especially a line of
    articles like the dried fruits, are omitted, I would not be
    responsible for the good health of the user.

    Within the borders of civilization, and especially with those people
    doing office work or following any indoor occupation which does not
    require plenty of bodily exertion, constipation is a serious menace,
    in fact I think it is the cause of many ills which are generally
    attributed to other sources. In the woods it is somewhat different,
    for the long tramps and other violent exercises tend to keep the
    bowels open, but it is not so with all men, and especially with those
    who hail from the city. Even the seasoned woodsman should not trifle
    with anything of so serious a nature, for even to him chronic
    constipation may come as the result of a steady diet of white flour
    and other constipating foods. In the lists which I give the foods
    most harmful in this way are wheat flour, especially when used in
    baking powder bread, cheese, rice, beans and peas. The foods most
    valuable for offsetting the bad effects of the above are the dried
    fruits, especially prunes, and cornmeal. Fresh meat and onions act as
    laxatives also, but too much of any of these foods may cause the
    system to fortify itself against them and their good effects are
    reduced greatly. Many kinds of food are difficult to digest; but it
    should be remembered that all stomachs are not alike and what is
    indigestible for one man is easily assimilated by another. The only
    way to learn what foods are harmful and which ones are not is by
    trying them, but this should be done and the results known before
    going into the woods.

    Tea and coffee are used extensively in the woods because they are
    very refreshing to tired travelers. Tea is especially invigorating.
    But both of these drinks, if used in excess, are harmful. Coffee
    injures the nervous system directly, while indirectly it works on
    other organs, and tea is injurious to the stomach, also the nerves.
    Taken in reasonable amount these drinks will do no harm, but they
    should never be used to the exclusion of water. The latter is the
    natural drink and we cannot use too much.

    The fifth requirement in camp foods is one that must not be
    forgotten. On a long trip into the bush the outfit is sure to get a
    certain amount of rough usage; a pack strap may give way or the
    packer may stumble or slip and down goes the pack. With but few
    exceptions, then, everything which will not stand a reasonable amount
    of rough handling has no right to a place on the outer's list. The
    exceptions are a few articles which when taken in small quantities
    must be put up in glass and these few foods are pickles, vinegar and
    others of similar nature. If any other less breakable container can
    be found for these it is better to use it, but if these foods are in
    bottle same must be carefully packed to prevent breakage. Eggs are
    the most unsatisfactory of all foods for transportation into the
    wilds, for they are easily broken, cannot be kept during cold weather
    and spoil quickly when the weather is mild.

    This is not an article on packing or otherwise transporting outfits
    into the bush, but I wish to say this in regard to packing foods,
    that all packages and containers should be as light as possible
    consistent with strength and durability. Paper sacks are not the
    proper thing, for they are so easily torn. It is by far the better
    plan to have small duck or muslin bags for all dry foods. Nothing
    should be taken if put up in wooden boxes or other containers having
    sharp edges or corners, but all such articles should be removed and
    placed in the cloth sacks. If this is impossible it is better to
    eliminate such goods from the list.

    To give a list of foods which are suitable for steady diet in the
    wilds is easy, and it may be a perfect list, well balanced,
    nourishing and having all the other desirable qualities, yet it may
    not be satisfactory for general use. Individual tastes do not all
    follow the same channels and there are no end of people who could
    pick from any list of foods that I might give a number of articles
    which they cannot eat or which are not received kindly by their
    respective systems. Another thing is the difference in quantity of
    food consumed by different men. While a life in the open air with
    continuous physical exercise from before daylight until after dark
    develops an appetite in any man, with some men their appetites seem
    absolutely insatiable and they consume enormous quantities of food.
    It is therefore difficult to give a list which may be taken as an
    accurate guide and approximate quantities only can be given, these
    being in the present time based on what I consider a normal
    woodsman's appetite. Note in the following lists quantities intended
    for one man one month's use and if the lists look good they may be
    used for a basis on which to figure the amounts of food required for
    the length of time.

    List No. 1.--Twenty pounds wheat flour and ten pounds cornmeal, or 25
    pounds wheat flour and five pounds cornmeal; one and a half pounds
    best baking powder, free of alum; three pounds table salt (this is
    more than necessary for food, but allows for preserving game); ten
    pounds bacon or five pounds bacon and five pounds salt pork; one
    pound lard or "Crisco" (this is seldom needed if all bacon grease is
    saved and used for cooking); three pounds creamery or canned butter;
    10 pounds beans, small or large, as preferred; four pounds split
    peas; five pounds evaporated fruit, either apples, apricots or
    peaches, assorted if desired; four pounds prunes; six pounds sugar
    (seven pounds if used in tea and coffee); two pounds tea (black,
    green or mixed) or three pounds ground coffee in airtight tins; one
    bottle, about two pounds, sour pickles; four pounds evaporated,
    unsweetened milk in small size tins; two pounds cheese; one ounce
    black pepper. Eighty-seven and a half to 89 1/2 pounds total weight.

    The foregoing is my standard list on which I have based many a
    purchase of supplies, and while I vary quantities sometimes, and add
    luxuries now and then, the list alone, just as given, makes an
    excellent one for real woods trips.

    In the following I have cut down the quantities of some articles and
    added the equivalent in other goods, thus giving greater variety and
    making a ration that is less apt to grow tiresome in time.

    List No. 2.--Eighteen pounds wheat flour and five pounds cornmeal;
    two pounds crackers or soda biscuits; one pound of best baking
    powder; three pounds table salt; six pounds bacon and four pounds
    salt pork; three and a half pounds creamery or canned butter; seven
    pounds beans; three pounds split peas; five pounds evaporated fruits,
    assorted as desired; four pounds prunes; eight pounds sugar; two
    pounds tea or three pounds coffee, ground and in airtight tins;
    two-pound bottle sour pickles; five pounds evaporated milk in small
    tins; four pounds rice; one pound seeded raisins; two ounces
    cinnamon; one ounce black pepper; two pounds cheese; five pounds
    Bermuda onions. Ninety and a half pounds to 91 1/2 pounds total
    weight.

    I think the above list will be more generally satisfactory than the
    first, but if the camper has preferences in regard to the kind of
    food selected he may use these lists only as a basis on which to
    figure. The weights given are net and do not include extra
    containers. It will be noted that the total weight is nearly the same
    in both; but the second allows for a more varied menu. I have added
    to this one four pounds of rice. The raisins, with the additional
    sugar and milk, are mainly for this dish. I have also added an extra
    half-pound of butter, for it will be needed to make rice pudding. The
    cinnamon is for use in apple sauce and on rice. By eliminating the
    crackers and half the salt a couple of pounds of oatmeal and a brick
    of maple sugar may be added, thereby again increasing the number of
    items without additional weight and making a good wholesome breakfast
    dish (oatmeal porridge), or one that can be prepared quickly, also
    providing syrup for the pancakes--"white hopes," as one of my camping
    companions called them.

    Some of the above-named foods can be cooked satisfactorily only in
    the permanent camp, while others are suitable for use in camp or on
    the trail. When making long tramps away from my cabin and camping out
    at night by the side of a fire I like to travel as lightly equipped
    as possible without sacrificing comfort, therefore I carry very
    little camp equipment and especially few cooking utensils. This
    necessitates the use of very simple, easily prepared dishes.
    Ordinarily I carry only the following foods: Flour mixed with the
    proper amount of baking powder and salt; bacon, sliced and with the
    rind removed; oatmeal, sugar, butter, tea, and a small sack
    containing a few ounces of salt. The latter is for use in cooking
    game killed during the day. It will be obvious then that if the
    camper follows my plan he must base his quantities of these articles
    on the proportion of time which he believes will be spent on the
    trail or camping out. If the time so spent will be limited he can cut
    down slightly on the amounts of these foods and add others more to
    his liking if he wishes, but, on the other hand, if he expects to do
    much camping out he must increase the quantity of such foods as can
    be used on the trail.

    Judging from my own experience it is easier to choose good camp foods
    than to know which to use from the list for a meal and how to prepare
    them. On stormy days, or when for any other reason the camper is
    spending sufficient time at the main cabin, he can cook such foods as
    beans, split peas, rice, game, salt pork and dried fruits, also can
    make good use of the maple syrup and other luxuries. For short order
    meals, as, for instance, when returning to camp long past meal time
    and in a half famished condition, oatmeal porridge, bannock (baking
    powder bread), bacon and tea or coffee will generally satisfy. Here,
    for instance, is a good menu for a day when the hunter or trapper
    wants to make a journey away from the main camp, returning late in
    the afternoon. He rises early in the morning and prepares breakfast
    of coffee, pancakes, maple syrup and bacon, or, perhaps, has fried
    venison, moose or caribou steak. Immediately after breakfast he
    places over the fire a kettle of beans with a piece of salt pork and
    he boils this until he is ready to leave camp, which may be an hour
    later. While the beans are cooking and he is waiting for daylight he
    prepares the outfit which he will take with him for the day. His
    lunch will be crackers, or if not too cold a piece of bannock, a few
    slices of bacon, a small piece of cheese and tea. The bushman always
    carries a small tea pail with him, if only a tin can fitted with a
    wire bail. He returns about sunset and as soon as he has made a fire
    he places over it the partly cooked pork and beans. By the time they
    have finished cooking he has baked a bannock, stewed some fruit or
    prunes, or made rice pudding. Thus he goes on day after day, varying
    his menu as far as possible, as well as his methods of preparing the
    foods.

    In the lists which I have given I have purposely refrained from
    naming the many prepared and condensed camp foods, because my
    experience with most of them has been limited and many of them I have
    never even tasted. I refer to such articles as desiccated vegetables,
    dried eggs, milk powder, erbswurst, pemmican, saccarine, tea tablets,
    soup tablets, etc.

    Before closing I would like to say a few words in regard to game and
    fish as food. While I do not advise making much allowance for them
    when purchasing supplies the man who goes into the wilds to camp
    should avail himself of any opportunity which offers to secure game
    and fish for his use, but he should, of course, never kill more than
    is needed, and unless driven to it by hunger should not kill
    protected game out of season. If he kills more than he can use at the
    time and the weather is too warm to keep it without curing he should
    dry the meat and he will find it an excellent article for lunches and
    when camping out. But what I wanted to get at is this, that many
    animals which are seldom considered as fit for food and are generally
    thrown away or used for bait are really fine food and by using them
    there will be less need of violating the game laws. Among the animals
    which are trapped and may be used for food are bears (when killed in
    fall or winter), muskrats, raccoons, opossums and beavers. Woodchucks
    are not bad eating if properly cooked, but they can only be secured
    in summer. The porcupine is another animal which may be eaten,
    although I cannot say that the meat is palatable. Many people in
    Canada eat the flesh of lynx, but I draw the line on carnivorous
    animals. I have tried it, in fact, I have eaten all the animals named
    above.

    My parting advice is to practice economy. The food which has been
    transported over so many miles of rough trail by the hardest kind of
    toil should never be wasted. The saving habit is a good one to grow
    into and it can be practiced as well in the woods as in our own
    homes.



    FIRES FOR VARIOUS USES

    Most fires to-day are started by means of matches, so, as a starting
    place we will first consider the match. Insignificant little
    stick--500 for five cents--yet that tiny match can start a fire that
    would destroy a city or lay a hundred miles of forest in ruin! Many a
    life has been saved by a match, and many millions, yes billions of
    dollars worth of property has been destroyed by the same
    insignificant little stick. It is on one hand one of the greatest
    providers of comfort that science has produced, and on the other the
    most powerful destroyer known to man. There are various kinds of
    matches, each having properties peculiar to itself, but we will
    compare only the most common kinds and judge them from the woodsman's
    standpoint.

    I believe the first matches to come into use were made of a sulfurous
    compound and such matches are still used in large quantities in
    Canada. They are generally considered superior to ordinary parlor
    matches for woodsman's use, but I cannot see that they possess any
    advantages whatever. They are just as difficult to light as parlor
    matches, if not more so, just as easily blown out, and just as
    susceptible to dampness. They are noiseless, which is in their favor,
    but they throw off disagreeable fumes when lighted. They are reliable
    matches for the woodsman, although I would take parlor matches in
    preference.

    We have also the little, so-called "safety" matches now so much used
    by smokers. They are convenient for carrying and get their name from
    their refusal to light when struck on any surface other than the side
    of the box in which they are packed. But this very quality makes them
    unfit to light a fire in a wind if one must hold in his hand the
    match-box as well as the burning match, for he cannot "cup" his hands
    perfectly. This is worth remembering, for out of doors, there is
    nearly always enough wind to make trouble when building a fire.
    Another fault of the safety match is its small size; it is apt to be
    entirely consumed before the fire can be started. The parlor match
    then is the match for the woodsman, and he should have a bountiful
    supply when he turns his back on civilization.

    The stock of matches should be kept in a waterproof case of some
    kind. A screw top jar is very good if one has it in camp, but
    glassware is not practical for camping trips and something less
    fragile but equally waterproof should be found. I have a kodak tank
    developing outfit, the metal tank of which is excellent for holding
    matches. The cover locks on by a partial turn and is watertight,
    while the tank holds enough matches for a whole winter's use.

    Of course the woodsman will carry with him on his sojourns from camp
    only a small quantity of matches and at least a few of them should
    either be so treated as to render them impervious to water, or be
    carried in a watertight box. It sometimes happens that the traveler
    in the woods gets caught in a drenching rain, or he may fall into the
    water, and unless some provision has been made for keeping the
    matches dry there will be no more smokes or tea until he gets back to
    camp. Sometimes more serious consequences may follow such negligence;
    for instance, the traveler may break through the ice and without a
    fire may freeze to death. Almost every outdoor man can recall
    instances where dry matches would at least have added materially to
    his comfort.

    There are various ways of waterproofing matches. They may be dipped
    in melted paraffine, which will keep them perfectly dry, and when the
    protecting wax is removed they will be in first class condition.
    Varnishes of one kind or another will serve the same purpose.

    But a waterproof box is more reliable and convenient. There is one
    match-box on the market that is very efficient. It is somewhat
    difficult to open, especially when one's hands are cold, but for all
    of that it is the best thing I know of, and as its contents are to be
    used only in emergency cases the woodsman may be content with the box
    as it is. I have seen match-boxes made from brass shotgun shells
    which were practically waterproof if kept tightly closed, but
    sometimes it is difficult to remove the cover. A small glass bottle
    is also good for carrying matches and is frequently used for this
    purpose.

    [Illustration: LIGHTING A MATCH IN THE WIND.]

    It is an easy matter to light a match; but to start a fire is
    something different, and to build a fire when the wind is blowing is
    often difficult. Even the simple lighting of a pipe in the wind is
    very uncertain with many smokers. I have seen men out in an exposed
    place strike match after match in a vain endeavor to light a pipe.
    Yet rightly done the trick is easy. It is all right to get behind a
    tree if one is near; but it is not at all necessary. In all cases the
    man should turn his face towards the wind and as soon as he strikes
    the match, form a cup of his hands and thus shelter the burning
    match. Then it is easy to thrust the bowl of the pipe into his hands
    to the burning match. A fire can be started in the same way, but it
    is a little more difficult and less certain. The kindling must be
    properly arranged with the part to be lighted projecting towards the
    breeze, and sufficiently separated from other objects, so that the
    fire builder may enclose this part in the shelter of his hands, along
    with the match, and thus protect the flame until the kindling is
    fairly lighted. Often a sheet of bark dropped against the tiny flame
    will protect it until it gathers strength. A dry surface on which to
    strike a match is essential and the woodsman must use his knowledge
    of suitable surfaces to help him out of his trouble. A pocket
    match-box usually has one side roughened for this purpose. A very
    practical idea is to sew a small strip of emery cloth on the inside
    of the coat, the upper half being loose so that it folds down over
    the other half and thus keeps the rough surface from contact with the
    clothing. The back of a pocket-knife, the butt plate of a gun, or a
    key may also be made to answer. Of natural surfaces the side of a
    stone or the dry trunk of a tree may serve. But the most common
    scheme is to utilize the trouser leg for striking matches and as long
    as the clothing is dry it is certainly the most convenient surface
    for this purpose.

    When a match gets wet, if
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  5. Vaarna_Aarne Ask me about anime Patron

    Vaarna_Aarne
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    Well, someone did ask me to post it, and I already had it uploaded, and making an issue post takes less than a minute...
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  6. MessiahMan Savant Patron

    MessiahMan
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    Fuck that whiner. This is immensely enjoyable, and a fantastic idea. Keep it coming, I wants me some more!
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  7. praetor Prophet

    praetor
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    i agree. the first chapter with the "Science Gestapo" was incredibly silly and retarded (except for the last few panels) but after that it's a massive :incline: and he should definitely carry on

    anyway, mr. VA, you seem like a knowledgeable fella in these sorts of things... what other works by this Moore individual would you recommend? p.s.: besides what you posted here, i've only read Watchmen and enjoyed it quite a bit (and i dislike a lot the usual american superhero comics so...)
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  8. Mangoose Arcane Patron

    Mangoose
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    I've heard good things about Swamp Thing and League of Extraordinary Gentlemen. If you can handle american superhero: Batman - Killing Joke, Superman - Whatever Happened to the Man of Tomorrow?
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  9. Vaarna_Aarne Ask me about anime Patron

    Vaarna_Aarne
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    V for Vendetta and From Hell are the obvious works by Moore to pick up when you're going through his works. Along this and Watchmen, they're the ones over which people fight over for superiority. They're all absolutely fantastic.

    V for Vendetta is something better read after watching the movie if you intend to watch it, since the movie is an utter travesty when you compare it to the comic. It simply doesn't have the same massive political balls. And of course, in it V is not a mad bomber and a terrorist through and through, no matter how he is fighting a totalitarian system. Since this time, the fascist party members are not political Hitler strawmen, but real ordinary people with various acceptable reasons for working for the system. The world is also much more fleshed out and fascinating as we walk through it. You know you're in for something when the first panel you see is that of a loudspeaker at evening, and you read, without a banal exposition (not even dates) telling us what's going on:

    "Good evening London. It's nine o'clock and this is the Voice of Fate broadcasting on 275 and 285 in the medium wave... It is the Fifth of Eleventh Nineteen-Seventy-Seven..."

    From Hell on the other hand is the ultimate showing of Moore's attention to detail and research in his script, for it is one of the most dense and most technically expertly crafted narratives of all time. And the finest piece of historical fiction I know of. And most of all, it's not a murder mystery story. It's a story about murder and all parties involved. In the second chapter, we are introduced to Jack the Ripper, sir William Whithey Gull, and we see Queen Victoria give him his mighty task. It's also a good introduction to Moore's views on magic. For Gull doesn't merely prevent a royal scandal. He is a man of science and reason on a mad quest to perform the magic ritual that will ensure the dominance of rationality and the male brain in the twentieth century. Absolutely marvelous. Jack the Ripper's monologue to the modern times will stick with you forever.

    Swamp Thing and League of Extraordinary Gentlemen are fantastic, top of the line comics and fiction in general. Swamp Thing is a story of a spiritual journey(s) of what could be the noblest character in all of fiction. Swamp Thing is also a look at Moore's ethical views, horror and it is an absolutely beautiful book due to the standard crew of John Totleben and Steve Bissette. League of Extraordinary Gentlemen is a tribute to pop culture across the ages, construction of a world where all fictional stories actually happened, the second volume is the finest and most faithful take on War of the Worlds you can find, and you see fantastic characterisations of of classic figures of fiction. "My god. Look at them. Nemo... Nemo is worse than Hyde." And figure out why Alan Moore considers that mister Hyde is the most honourable of the characters in the League.

    I also recommend Alan Moore's reconstruction of the Superman Mythos, Supreme. It's Moore's swan song for the superhero's classic days, written in his intelligent and insightful manner. It's a mostly ugly book though, until the then starting Chris Sprouse takes over artist's duties for present day stories. Otherwise you'll be treated to fantastic imitations of period style artwork by Rick Veitch.

    If you want a very different take on superheroes, read Top Ten. It's the story about the police department of a city where all the superheroes, mad scientists, gods, supernatural beings and pulp heroes of the world were relocated after World War Two ended. And the art by Zander Cannon inked by Gene Ha really brings about the wondrous and unearthly city of Neopolis built by captured Nazi superscientists Moore invented. It's not even a superhero comic really (though it's single actual fight scene is magnificent in all respects), but a police procedural and a character drama. Also has the local music, as written by Moore himself. The music of robots, or Ferro-Americans as it's politically correct to call them, Scrap is a particular favourite of mine. The spin-offs Moore wrote, Smax and Forty-Niners are also great stuff, Smax more so.

    Also, the first chapter is intentionally stupid and silly. It's a throwback to the original comics, and is meant to contrast what we see next. Bump onto the next page, and I'll post two more issues, and two more on the page after that, and so on and on.

    Other comic book authors you must definately read are Grant Morrison, Moore's only equal, and Neil Gaiman, who is pretty much Moore's protege.
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  10. MessiahMan Savant Patron

    MessiahMan
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    *Whistles a jaunty tune*

    Nope, I don't want to see this go to the second page anytime soon.
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  11. MessiahMan Savant Patron

    MessiahMan
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  12. praetor Prophet

    praetor
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    i'm with you.

    @VA: of Gaiman's work i've only read American Gods and thought it was quite enjoyable and i have his Sandman series somewhere "not removed from inventory". never heard of Morrison... off to piratebay google i go
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  13. ghostdog Prestigious Gentleman Arcane Patron

    ghostdog
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    Fuck that whiner indeed, obviously she saw the first couple of images and thought she had the comic figured out, pathetic. Miracleman is an awesome piece of work.

    Here is the complete series for direct download : LINK (all links are interchangeable)

    It's better to have it in your pc and read it with comic reader or something ;)
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  14. Vaarna_Aarne Ask me about anime Patron

    Vaarna_Aarne
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    Well, I'll still oblige the lazier bastards and post the rest, two issues per page.
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  15. praetor Prophet

    praetor
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    then lets get to the next page!
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  16. MessiahMan Savant Patron

    MessiahMan
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    Codex 2012 Project: Eternity Wasteland 2
    That link is all well and good. I've already downloaded it because I need to read more, but having the thing posted here for all to see strikes me as a prime example of best use of the library forum.

    Plus, it near brings a tear to my eye to see a Codexer doing something productive instead of bawling like an infant over feature X geting cut from shitty remake of good game Y.
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  17. praetor Prophet

    praetor
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    bump
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  18. Vaarna_Aarne Ask me about anime Patron

    Vaarna_Aarne
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    bumpety bump
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  19. praetor Prophet

    praetor
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    only 6 more! we can do it!

    btw, VA, to speed the proceedings a bit for the next page maybe you can make 1 chapter=1post so that less bumps are required to get to a new page?
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  20. Vaarna_Aarne Ask me about anime Patron

    Vaarna_Aarne
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    Sure, I'll do that.
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  21. praetor Prophet

    praetor
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    great


    4 to go...
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  22. gromit Arcane

    gromit
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    PMUB!
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  23. praetor Prophet

    praetor
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    awesome! only 2 more to go!
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  24. Vaarna_Aarne Ask me about anime Patron

    Vaarna_Aarne
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    Herp
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  25. Vaarna_Aarne Ask me about anime Patron

    Vaarna_Aarne
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    Derp
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