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Displaying Items 281 - 300 of 448

Mass Effect Reviewed

Review - posted by baby arm on Mon 15 December 2008, 01:48:38

Tags: BioWare; Mass Effect

Local forumgoer/Clash afficianado Andyman Messiah took a trip or five through BioWare's [B][URL='http://masseffect.bioware.com/']Mass Effect[/URL][/B] and then decided to inflict his experience on the rest of us. [URL='http://www.rpgcodex.net/content.php?id=182']Read on...[/URL]

There are 42 comments on Mass Effect Reviewed

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Fallout 3 - the nth opinion

Information - posted by Elwro on Thu 11 December 2008, 10:02:32

Tags: Bethesda Softworks; Fallout 3

Read Elwro's opinion on the Bethesda's new "ambitious" FPS, with surprisingly bad shooter elements and surprisingly good RPG-related features.

There are 11 comments on Fallout 3 - the nth opinion

Forgotten Gems: Might & Magic III, IV, and V

Review - posted by baby arm on Tue 2 December 2008, 23:10:40

Tags: Might and Magic III: Isles of Terra; Might and Magic IV: Clouds of Xeen; Might and Magic V: Darkside of Xeen; New World Computing

Local forum dweller Wyrmlord has submitted a review of New World Computing's Might & Magic III, Might & Magic IV, and Might & Magic V.
Skills also influence exploration of certain terrain. There is a Swimming skill which allows you to navigate shallow waters (It is innate to Humans), a Mountaineering skill to navigate mountains, and so on. But apart from skills, you will also need spells to explore the world. A fascinating thing about this game is that there are high towers in them, and if you reach their rooftops, you will be right inside the skies and can use Levitation spell to walk on clouds. If there is a large sea of lava between you and your destination, you use Teleportation. If you want a simultaneous top down view of the area, you have to use Wizard's Eye. Please note that these spells aren't merely helpful, they are essential. Sometimes a combination of spells will be needed. And you won't be told how or when to use them.

Read on for more.

There are 7 comments on Forgotten Gems: Might & Magic III, IV, and V

Edward R Murrow's Dissertation on Fallout 3

Review - posted by DarkUnderlord on Fri 21 November 2008, 01:58:52

Tags: Bethesda Softworks; Fallout 3

What, just one review for the most widely anticipated Codex game in years? Not bloodly likely. Here now, gentle readers, is Edward R Murrow's Critical Dissertation on Fallout 3: Islands of Good Awash in a Sea of Mediocre, Time-Wasting Drivel:
Generally, it was pretty much what I suspected it would be, with a few pleasant surprises, and a few "How could they be that thick?" moments. It's a Bethesda game through and through, with all of their trademark flaws and few of Fallout's strengths preserved. Fallout 3 basically plays much like a post-apocalyptic Oblivion with guns and a few tweaks, despite what some might say. Bethesda did not stray far from their formula, for better or for worse. It does some things right, and it does a whole heap-load of things wrong. I wasn't exactly pleased with it, but it could have been a lot worse.
How could it have been worse? Read on...

There are 35 comments on Edward R Murrow's Dissertation on Fallout 3

Chefe does Fallout 3

Review - posted by DarkUnderlord on Sun 9 November 2008, 03:05:24

Tags: Bethesda Softworks; Fallout 3

Codex forumite Chefe decided to actually buy Fallout 3 and play it. He also decided to write a review. I decided to publish that review here. You get to read it and decide whether that was a good thing or not:
Fallout 3 is a very enjoyable hiking simulator. This title has been bestowed by many upon Bethesda’s titles, and their post apocalyptic wonderland takes the cake. It’s fun, silly, odd, engaging, and engrossing. Much has been said about this game from both camps; the lovers and the haters. I consider it a worthwhile investment if discovery is your thing and you’re willing to take a break from the high fantasy worlds and high-tech sci-fi environs that populate most of today’s industry. Fallout 3 is down to earth while still being crazy. It’s difficult and accessible. It’s gory and humble. It’s the sum of gaming paradox.
But above all, it’s a post nuclear role playing game.

You may also wonder why the screenshots don't match up with the text but hey, I can only work with what I'm sent.

There are 128 comments on Chefe does Fallout 3

Cyclopean Interview

Interview - posted by Elwro on Wed 8 October 2008, 03:18:30

Tags: Cyclopean; Iron Tower Studios

An interview with Scott, the Lead Developer and Writer of the Lovecraft-inspired cRPG "Cyclopean" from the Iron Tower Studios.

There are 14 comments on Cyclopean Interview

Uberlong Fable: The Lost Chapters Review

Review - posted by Role-Player on Tue 2 September 2008, 13:43:49

Tags: Fable: The Lost Chapters; Lionhead Studios

So, there's this game called Fable: The Lost Chapters that lets you choose hats and deal with the consequences of flatulence. That guy who thinks he knows what a role-playing game is takes a look at it:
Since the Hero never displays any kind of motivation behind his actions we're left with an empty shell that is given a fixed semblance of a personality, one that sometimes may not even correspond to the personality we try to imbue in him. There are also a couple of situations where the game doesn't seem to know how to handle the freedom it offers. During the training in the Guild I repeatedly assaulted a roommate, only to be called to the presence of a Hero which grew irate with every new attempt of mine and warned me not to repeat this, or else I'd suffer the consequences. Well, the consequence here was that the same warning would be repeated on and on without the main character being punished in any way. The most powerful wizard in the guild threatened to snuff out my life force if I kept beating him but as with most dogs, it was all bark and no bite. And after the 73rd crotch punch with no punishment, it was time to move along.
Goddamn you, so-called "Role-Player". Is there nothing that pleases you?!

There are 8 comments on Uberlong Fable: The Lost Chapters Review

Mount & Blade MS Paint Competition

Competition - posted by DarkUnderlord on Sun 24 August 2008, 03:47:07

Tags: Mount & Blade

Score yourself a free copy (downloadable Gamer's Gate version) of Mount & Blade by entering the Codex' MS Paint competition.

View the gallery of entrants here.

Winners will be announced here.

If you'd like to enter, just send your entry to darkunderlord at rpgcodex dot net or PM me on the forum or just post it in this thread or one of the news threads and we'll dig it out from there. We'll also accept multiple entries from people. We're very generous really.

All you need to do is send in something Mount & Blade related that you've drawn in MS Paint. It can be really good or just really funny or just down-right awful. Our panel of esteemed judges will review all entries and choose a handful of winners based on the images we think are worthy.

Competition closes on September 16th and judges' decision is final, though bribery may be accepted.

There are 1 comments on Mount & Blade MS Paint Competition

Forgotten Gems: Roxoring Betrayal at Krondor

Review - posted by DarkUnderlord on Mon 11 August 2008, 06:20:24

Tags: Betrayal at Krondor; Dynamix; Sierra Entertainment

As part of our Forgotten Gems series, [URL='http://rpgcodex.net/content.php?id=173']Darth Roxor takes a look[/URL] at the old classic Betrayal at Krondor: [INDENT]As I said before, the game is mostly based around exploration. The world really is huge, and the goodies hidden throughout the map are worth the effort. By venturing too far from the road, you might find chests with basic supplies like food rations, torches, whetstones or herbal packs that speed up the healing rate while resting, or maybe powerful potions that drastically boost your statistics, or simply a new sword or a set of armour if you are not satisfied with your current one. Normal chests can be either harmless, or locked, or trapped, or both. Many traps are lethal, and they can be ‘sensed’ only through a spell, so if you stumble upon such, but you are not quite confident about your lockpicking skill, it’s just better to let it be. Apart from these ‘normal’ chests, there are also Moredhel chests which have a wordlock upon them. When using such a chest, you are presented a riddle, and a few slides with letters. To open the chest, you must make the slides show the password (some of the riddles are [B]really[/B] hard, believe me).[/INDENT] [URL='http://rpgcodex.net/content.php?id=173']Check the rest here[/URL].

There are 7 comments on Forgotten Gems: Roxoring Betrayal at Krondor

A long-winded rant about BioShock

Review - posted by DarkUnderlord on Mon 28 July 2008, 11:01:23

Tags: BioShock

In the spirit of "there's no point writing a review for a one year old game unless you whinge about everything that's wrong with it", here's the long Codex whinge on BioShock:
... and it doesn't end there. BioShock also uses audio superbly as well. Beyond the audio diaries, the monsters you're fighting often have conversations with each other before they realise you're there. Then when they attack, they're using phrases that relate to the game-world rather. As you walk passed the in-game vending machines, they kick into life and start playing a cheery song. Video screens will display short movies as you walk by on occassion and some rooms even have speakers with audio advertising. As you find and collect Plasmids (the game's "magic spells"), you're shown a short video. Again, it's simple stuff but it makes you want to listen to the world and think about what you're hearing for at least a while before you go ahead and blow the next monster's brains out.

Sound makes BioShock good. Read more here.

There are 20 comments on A long-winded rant about BioShock

An interview with Vince D. Weller

Interview - posted by JarlFrank on Wed 23 April 2008, 18:18:43

Tags: Age of Decadence; Iron Tower Studios; Vault Dweller

We asked Vince D. of Iron Tower Studios a few questions about founding your own indie game studio. Here's a piece:
I've started with the setting, main story overview, and major design elements (character system, combat, multiple ways to handle quests, non-linearity, etc). I didn't do all the quests or ways to solve them, of course. I'm talking about the concept phase here. For example, one way to keep the main quest non-linear is to have multiple factions interested in it. These factions shouldn't want the same thing as that would make your choice of a faction less important. So, they should want different things which would give you different reasons to pursue the main quest and would require you to make very different decisions once you are at the end of your journey. At the same time you can't be sent to several different directions at once, so your final destination should be able to offer and support different outcomes, etc. In other words, you develop the frame of a game first and then fill it in with the actual content.

There are 20 comments on An interview with Vince D. Weller

Eschalon Review

Review - posted by Elwro on Sat 29 March 2008, 20:08:54

Tags: Basilisk Games; Eschalon: Book I

Basilisk Games are newcomers to the indie RPG development field and their debut title, Eschalon: Book One, shows a lot of promise - if you like games with a definite oldschool feel. It's far from perfect, though. Read our review to learn our thoughts on the game. Read the full article: [URL='http://www.rpgcodex.net/content.php?id=170']Eschalon Review[/URL]

There are 12 comments on Eschalon Review

2008: On the Horizon

Information - posted by Elwro on Mon 14 January 2008, 19:16:40


Since 2007 marked a definite upswing in the prevailing hivemind opinion on the state of PC CRPG's (apart from The Sequel That Shall Not Be Named, of course), we have a look at what to expect from 2008.

There are 10 comments on 2008: On the Horizon

Interview with the Afterfall lead designer

Interview - posted by JarlFrank on Wed 9 January 2008, 20:52:27

Tags: Afterfall; Intoxicate Interactive

We got a hold of Maciej Prósiński, lead designer of the Polish post-apoc indie RPG Afterfall, and asked him a few questions on it. Here's a bit on solutions to quests to make your mouth water:
Quests will have many solutions, most of which will only be available to a player character with specific skills. Thanks to the plot bypasses you will often come upon completely alternative solutions, for example, to convince someone to help you, you will use acquaintance with some important characters. It is worth to mention that certain choices in performing a quest will bear various, sometimes long-term consequences. Some of the suggested paths may also prove to be dead-ends.
As for the endings, we have adapted for ourselves the brilliant, but for an unknown reason never repeated solution from Fallout – the modular epilogue. After finishing the game and watching the outro presenting the consequence of the path you have chosen, you will also be able to see the fate of the world and its individual locations which you have influenced by your actions or non-action.

There are 5 comments on Interview with the Afterfall lead designer

2007: The Year in Review

Editorial - posted by Section8 on Fri 28 December 2007, 13:42:08

Tags: The Year in Review

Another year is drawing to a close, and unfortunately, Prince hasn't put his lyrical mind toward partying like it's 2007. So instead, I've opted to don stockings, banana hammock, scarf and midriff jacket and get the job done myself with the official RPG Codex Year in Review 2007 Platinum GOTY Edition. Pre-order now for a signed photo of me in said stockings, banana hammock, scarf and midriff jacket!

There are 5 comments on 2007: The Year in Review

Styrateg review

Review - posted by Elwro on Wed 12 December 2007, 20:58:05


Rake in Grass bring us a turn-based fantasy game which, though not oozing innovation from every byte, is quite entertaining and might be just what you need on a lazy afternoon.

There are 12 comments on Styrateg review

The Witcher Review

Review - posted by Cardtrick on Sat 1 December 2007, 15:34:27

Tags: CD Projekt; Witcher, The

Cardtrick sent in this review of The Witcher, explaining why exactly this game is a worthy addition to any CRPG fan's collection: [INDENT]The Witcher is one of the first games . . . well, ever . . . to actively hype its choices and consequences. This alone should make it interesting to the average Codex reader. The basic idea, in case you've been living under a rock (or, you know, have a life outside of games) is that The Witcher presents you with choices during the course of the game without clear answers. Only much later in the game do you discover the consequences of your decisions, which can have significant impact on the plot.[/INDENT] Read the full article: [URL='http://www.rpgcodex.net/content.php?id=165']The Witcher Review[/URL]

There are 25 comments on The Witcher Review

Forgotten Gems: King of Dragon Pass Review

Review - posted by JarlFrank on Thu 22 November 2007, 20:20:05

Tags: A Sharp; King of Dragon Pass

JarlFrank reviews this '99 gem. Although a first glance might make you suspect this is a management strategy game, JarlFrank has no problem claiming this is, in fact, a genre-bender with such a large dose of the RPG design elements we all love that it belongs in our review repertoire and that you should play this game. Read his short & sweet review to find out why. Read the full article: [URL='http://www.rpgcodex.net/content.php?id=163']Forgotten Gems: King of Dragon Pass quickie review[/URL]

There are 6 comments on Forgotten Gems: King of Dragon Pass Review

The Broken Hourglass interview

Interview - posted by Vault Dweller on Mon 12 November 2007, 22:05:41

Tags: The Broken Hourglass

I decided to try something different and instead of asking 10-15 unconnected questions, I asked Jason Compton, the lead designer of The Broken Hourglass only 3 questions, but studied his answers under a microscope.

The difference is, dungeons tend to be more a bit exciting than storefronts and residences. Anyway, what do you have in the urban dungeon department? Discovering a well hidden, ancient door in some basement leading into unknown darkness somehow sounds more exciting then discovering a cave in the middle of nowhere, so tell us all about it.

There are three sequences in the main game which could be considered "urban dungeons." One is the old caverns beneath the Arena, where forgotten rubbish—and the occasional forgotten monster—is discarded. Another is an ancient tomb, cracked open by diggers hoping to tunnel their way out of the city. The creator of the tomb is still down there, so you can ask him all about how it was built, if you don't mind the smell. The third is a sequence which takes the player through a long-forgotten and roundabout path between two city districts, including a trip through the buried catacombs and a sewer system. The endgame also has aspects of "urban dungeon." All three certainly have their share of combat challenges, but the tomb and the catacombs sequences in particular are much more of a balanced adventure than a monster-bashing crawl.
Click here to read the rest, or if you've never heard about the game before, start with our first, introductory interview.

There are 7 comments on The Broken Hourglass interview

Mysteries of Westgate interview

Interview - posted by Vault Dweller on Fri 9 November 2007, 15:00:41

Tags: Neverwinter Nights 2

We were given an opportunity to ask Alan Miranda and Luke Scull a few questions about upcoming Mysteries of Westgate:

7) The game promises choices and "huge consequences." An actual example would go a long way to back up these claims and fill the hearts of unbelievers with faith.

Luke: I’m sure it would, but I wouldn’t want to spoil too much of the experience for players. Let’s just say that I know the depths of loathing loyal Codex readers reserve for developers that talk the talk but fail to meet expectations when it comes to choice and consequences. I’m not only walking but swaggering, and not just because I’m drunk.

Alan: I will echo Luke on this one, in that we definitely do provide some big choices with significant consequences to the player. We made a conscious decision when writing the core story during pre-production to allow for branches in the story instead of a single linear path. The challenge was to make the different branches as polished as if we had just made one route, since polishing a single linear path would take only half the time. Revealing what these choices are would ruin the story, so you’ll just have to keep the faith.
Click here to read the rest.

There are 6 comments on Mysteries of Westgate interview

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